Adult Programs

The Carlos Museums offers a wide variety of public programs for adults from scholarly symposia to informal Talk & Taste programs. Click on listings below for descriptions of programs below or visit the Museum calendar for specific information on scheduled programs.

Support for educational programs at the Michael C. Carlos Museum comes from the David R. Clare & Margaret C. Clare Foundation, an anonymous donor, the Marguerite Colville Ingram Fund, the Christian and Frances Humann Foundation, and Clara M. and John S. O'Shea.

AntiquiTEA
A civilized learning experience. Enjoy afternoon tea and scones as museum curators and Emory faculty members and graduate students discuss works of art in the collections and exhibitions.
 

Thursday, September 17
4 pm, Reception Hall, Level Three

Though ancient Egyptian civilization collapsed millennia ago, its arts continue to thrive in unexpected places. What does it mean when artists like Kara Walker and Matthew Barney use Egyptian imagery in their work? Enjoy afternoon tea and scones as Rachel Kreiter, a doctoral candidate in art history, discusses ancient Egyptian influences in contemporary art using examples from the Carlos collection to illustrate the pharaonic sources artists are looking to for inspiration in the 21st century.

Thursday, October 15
4 pm Reception Hall, Level Three

When Native North Americans were confronted with the European weapon of choice, the rifle, they not only mastered the use of it, but also turned it on its head, literally, to change its form into one of
their traditional weapons, the war club, sending a strong message of retaliation and determination to maintain their ways of living. Laura Wingfield, assistant curator of art of the Americas, discusses the gun/war club as a work of art and a political statement for many Native American groups.
Image: Ball-head Club with Gun Form. Anishinaabe, Ojibwa, Wisconsin or Minnesota, ca. 1820. Wood. Diker no. 851


Thursday, November 12
4 pm,  Reception Hall, Level Three

Displaying Native North American art has social and political ramifications, given the long, negative history between the indigenous peoples and the U.S. government. The inclusion of Hopi “kachina” figures is a case in point. While some tribal members see them as commodities, others follow the traditional belief that they are spirits, their roles secret, and no one outside of initiates should see them; this impacts whether 19th-century katsinam can be ethically shown in a museum setting. Rebecca Stone, faculty curator of Art of the Americas, discusses various viewpoints on the issue and other curatorial issues related to Indigenous Beauty.
 

Thursday, December 3
4 pm, Reception Hall, Level Three

The exhibition Indigenous Beauty includes a large ink drawing from 1920 depicting The Battle of Little Big Horn by  Standing Bear. Enjoy afternoon tea and scones as Michael Elliott, Executive Associate Dean of Emory College and author of Custerology: The Enduring Legacy of the Indian Wars and George Armstrong Custer, discusses the contested legacy of both. 

Image: Detail from Standing Bear (Lakota, 1859-1933) Pine Ridge, South Dakota. The Battle of LIttle Big Horn, ca. 1920. Pencil, pen and ink on muslin. Diker no. 652.

Museum Tours

PUBLIC TOURS: Members of the Museum's Docent Guild lead public tours of the permanent collection and special exhibitions every Sunday at 2:00 p.m. Tours begin in the Rotunda on Level One of the Museum.

Docent-led tours are available for groups of ten or more by appointment. Please call 404-727-0519 to schedule a tour for your group. Please call at least two weeks in advance.
 

AUDIO TOURS

Highlights of the Collection Audio Tour
Thanks to the generous financial support of the Sara Giles Moore Foundation, the Carlos Museum is pleased to introduce an updated audio guide to the permanent collections. The guides include fifty minutes of new material, featuring expert commentary from museum curators and Emory faculty members from a number of departments at the University. The guides available on iPod touches, feature enhanced multimedia content offering visitors a greater understanding of the Carlos Museum’s permanent collection. For example, in the Art of the Americas section, images of whale sharks on the screen help visitors visualize the ways in which the Museum’s Chancay female effigy vessel represents the shaman transforming into the giant fish, which serves as her animal spirit companion. The guide is available for a rental fee of $3. It is included in the general audio tour rental. Carlos Museum members enjoy unlimited free usage.

Times and Texts of the Bible Audio Tour

A second audio tour makes connections between the Museum's permanent collections and the Bible. Curators and faculty members from Emory University's Candler School of Theology and the Departments of Religion and Middle Eastern Studies explore objects in relation to biblical texts to enhance our understanding of the cultures out of which Judaism and Christianity developed. The guide is available for a rental fee of $3. It is included in the general audio tour rental. Museum members enjoy unlimited free usage.

MUSEUM MOMENTS TOURS
Museum Moments is a tour designed for people with mild cognitive impairment or dementia and is based on the successful Meet Me program developed by the Museum of Modern Art. Experiencing the art of the ancient world at the Carlos Museum can spark the imagination, trigger memories, and encourage a shared experience in a beautiful setting. Individuals with mild cognitive impairment, early Alzheimer’s or dementia are invited to attend Museum Moments tours with their family member or a caregiver. To schedule a time contact Julie Green at 404-727-2363.

Stools for this program were made possible by a gift from Sylvia Dodson in memory of her husband, James Dodson.

Chamber Music Concerts
The Office of Educational presents a series of noontime chamber music concerts performed by members and guests of the Emory Chamber Music Society of Atlanta. The concerts are free and open to the Emory community and the public. Please arrive early as these concerts fill up quickly!

Friday, September 18
Noon, Reception Hall, Level Three

Jessica Wu, viola; Guang Wang, cello, and William Ransom, piano perform Beethoven's Piano Trio No. 1 and Cello Sonata No. 1.  

Friday, October 23
Noon, Reception Hall, Level Three

William Fitzpatrick, violin; and William Ransom, piano perform sonatas by Edvard Grieg and Maurice Ravel. 

Friday, November 13
Noon, Reception Hall, Level Three

Emory's best undergraduate talent perform.

Friday, December 11
Noon, Reception Hall, Level Three

Kate Ransom, violin, and William Ransom, piano, perform Cesar Franck’s beautiful Sonata in A Major

Friday, January 22
Noon, Reception Hall, Level Three

Franz Schubert’s great song cycle, Winterreisse, cycle sung by bass Daniel Cole, with William
Ransom, piano.

Friday, February 12
Noon, Reception Hall, Level Three

Tenor Bradley Howard and soprano Abigail Santos Villalobos perform Valentine's Day Love Songs with Erika Tazawa, piano.

Friday, March 4
Noon, Reception Hall, Level Three

Ludwig van Beethoven’s Piano Sonata, op. 110, and Cello Sonata in A, Franz Schubert’s
Impromptu in G-flat with pianist Elena Cholakova and Guang Wang on cello.

Friday, April 1
Noon, Reception Hall, Level Three

A rare performance of B.la Bartok’s early Piano Quintet with Spanish pianist Leopoldo Erice and the Vega String Quartet—sponsored by the Friends of Music at Emory.

Friday, April 29
Noon, Reception Hall, Level Three

David Coucheron, violin and William Ransom, piano perform Camille Saint-Sans’s brilliant
Sonata in D Minor.  








Audio Tours
Thanks to the generous financial support of the Sara Giles Moore Foundation, the Carlos Museum is pleased to introduce an updated audio guide to the permanent collections. The guides include fifty minutes of new material, featuring expert commentary from museum curators and Emory faculty members from a number of departments at the University. The guides available on iPod touches, feature enhanced multimedia content offering visitors a greater understanding of the Carlos Museum’s permanent collection. For example, in the Art of the Americas section, images of whale sharks on the screen help visitors visualize the ways in which the Museum’s Chancay female effigy vessel represents the shaman transforming into the giant fish, which serves as her animal spirit companion. 

The audio guides may be rented for $3 at the Information Desk in the Museum rotunda and, as always, audio guides are free to Carlos Museum members.

A second audio tour makes connections between the Museum's permanent collections and the times and texts of the Bible. Curators and faculty members from Emory University's Candler School of Theology and the Departments of Religion and Middle Eastern Studies explore objects in relation to biblical texts to enhance our understanding of the cultures out of which Judaism and Christianity developed. The guide is available for a rental fee of $2. Museum members enjoy unlimited free usage.

Carlos Reads Book Club

Carlos Reads offers an opportunity to read great works of literature related to the museum's collections and exhibitions in an informal, small group setting with distinguished members of the Emory faculty as guides. Previous Carlos Reads programs include Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, The LIfe of the Buddha, Plato's Symposium, the Ramayana, Margaret Atwood's The Penelopiad, and The Lost Mandala of Sherlock Holmes, among others. Sign up to read and discuss one book, or many.

Carlos Reads discussions meet on Monday nights, unless otherwise noted, at 7:30 pm in the Board Room on Level Two of the museum. Prices vary according to the number of sessions and always include the cost of the book. Registration is required for each club by calling 404 727-6118. 

Spring semester's programs include:

Monday, January 25
7:30 pm, Board Room, Level Two
 

The exhibition Between the Sweet Water and the Swarm of Bees: A Collection of Works by Susanne Wenger features a book of Yoruba poetry compiled, translated, and edited by Ulli Beier and illustrated by Wenger, his wife. Arturo Lindsay, professor of art and art history at Spelman College, will lead readers through the poems focusing especially on those related to the orisha, the focus of Wenger’s silkscreens in the exhibition.

Fee: $15 for Carlos Museum members; $20 for non-members. Registration is required by calling 404-727-6118.


Virgil's Aeneid
Mondays, February 1–29, 7:30 pm
Board Room, Level Two
THIS PROGRAM IS FULL AND NO ADDITIONAL RESERVATIONS MAY BE TAKEN.

The Aeneid has been the most famous text (after the Bible) in the western world for 2000 years. Indeed, T.S. Eliot called it the “classic of all Europe.” Nevertheless, there rages currently a debate among Virgil scholars as to the most fundamental meaning of the poem. Is it celebratory (comic like the Odyssey) or tragic (like the Iliad) in its worldview? Is it—as some think—propaganda for Roman imperialism or—as others think—a critique? Over five Monday evenings, Virgil scholar and Professor of Classics at Emory, Christine Perkell, will lead readers through the text, attending to the poetics of the text in order to understand how the poem generates such divergent interpretations among readers.

Fee: $60 for Carlos Museum members; $85 for non-members. Registration is required by calling 404-727-6118.

In conjunction with the exhibition Doorway to an Enlightened World: The Tibetan Shrine of Alice S. Kandell, Sara McClintock, associate professor of religion at Emory University, leads readers through two masterworks of Tibetan literature, The Life of the Buddha and The Life of Milarepa
 
Monday, March 28
7:30 pm, Board Room, Level Two

The story of Shakyamuni Buddha’s epic journey to enlightenment is perhaps the most important narrative in the Buddhist tradition and serves as blueprint for a life of mindfulness, dedicated to the easing of suffering both for oneself and for others.
 
Tenzin Chögyel’s The Life of the Buddha, composed in the mid–eighteenth century and now in a vivid new translation, is a masterly storyteller’s rendition of the twelve acts of the Buddha. Chögyel’s classic tale seamlessly weaves together the vast and the minute, the earthly and the celestial, reflecting the near-omnipresent aid of the gods alongside the Buddha’s moving final reunion with his devoted son, Rahula. The Life of the Buddha has the power to engage people through a deeply human story with cosmic implications.
 
Fee: $25 for Carlos Museum members; $35 for non-members, and includes the cost of the book. Registration is required by calling 404-727-6118.

Monday, April 11
7:30 pm, Board Room, Level Two
 
One of the most beloved stories of the Tibetan people and a great literary example of the contemplative life, Tsangnyön Heruka’s The Life of Milarepa, a biography and a dramatic tale from a culture now in crisis, can be read on several levels. A personal and moving introduction to Tibetan Buddhism, it is also a detailed guide to the search for liberation. It presents a quest for purification and buddhahood in a single lifetime, tracing the path of a great sinner who became a great saint. It is also a powerfully evocative narrative, full of magic, miracles, suspense, and humor, while reflecting the religious and social life of medieval Tibet.
 
Fee: $25 for Carlos Museum members; $35 for non-members, and includes the cost of the book. Registration is required by calling 404-727-6118.
 
 

Lectures, Symposia, and Gallery Talks
The Museum's commitment of academic excellence is reflected in the lectures, symposia, and gallery talks presented by the Office of Educational Programs. The Museum draws on the rich resources of the University's faculty and supports Emory's academic mission by bringing nationally and internationally recognized scholars, authors, and artists to campus. Most of these public lectures and symposia are free and all are open to the Emory community and the public. For a listing of upcoming programs, please see the Calendar.
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