Adult Programs

The Carlos Museums offers a wide variety of public programs for adults from scholarly symposia to informal Talk & Taste programs. Click on listings below for descriptions of programs below or visit the Museum calendar for specific information on scheduled programs.

AntiquiTEA
A civilized learning experience. Enjoy afternoon tea and scones as museum curators and Emory faculty members and graduate students discuss works of art in the collections and exhibitions.
 
Tuesday, September 24
4 pm, Reception Hall

Dr. Jessica Stephenson, assistant professor of art history at Kennesaw State University, discusses the checkered life history of a magnificent carved reliquary figure from the Fang culture of Gabon. As part of this program, Dr. Stephenson will screen Susan Vogel’s masterful short film Fang which mixes documentary and fiction techniques to recount an African art object’s journey through a century of peril and adventure, and uses the film styles of each historical period to tell its story—a whole century of Western attitudes towards African culture packed into eight minutes.    
 
Tuesday, October 22
4 pm, Reception Hall

Rachel Kreiter, PhD candidate in the Art History Department, discusses images of the Egyptian goddess Hathor in the collection.
 
Tuesday, November 19
4 pm, Reception Hall

Judith Evans Grubbs, Betty Gage Holland Professor of Roman History, discusses Roman cinerary urns in the Carlos' collection.

Tuesday, December 3
4 pm, Reception Hall

Emory graduate student An Jiang discusses an Attic black-figure cup fragment in the Carlos's collection and how the piece may inform us about the artistic career of Nearchos, the finest Attic black-figure vase painter before the generation of Exekias. 

Tuesday, January 28
4 pm, Reception Hall

Billie Jean Collins of Emory’s Middle Eastern Studies Department and the Society of Biblical Literature, discusses a Mesopotamian head of a deity now on view on the Ancient Near Eastern Galleries.
 
Tuesday, February 25
4 pm, Reception Hall

Gay Robins, Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of Art History, discusses the imagery of vultures in ancient Egyptian art, including a relief of a goddess wearing a vulture headdress in the collection.
 
Tuesday, March 18
4 pm, Reception Hall

Ancient American scholar Dr. Laura Wingfield discusses a group of Colombian female sculptures in the collection that represent the female life cycle. 
 
Tuesday, April 22
4 pm, Reception Hall

Dr. Tara Doyle of Emory’s Religion Department discusses an extraordinary red sandstone figure of the Buddha in the collection.

Tuesday, May 6
4 pm, Reception Hall

Jan Rippentrop, student in Emory's Graduate Division of Religion, discusses a series of prints depicting biblical scenes of the life of Sampson featured in the exhibition Mirroring the Saints.
Chamber Music Concerts
The Office of Educational presents a series of noontime chamber music concerts performed by members and guests of the Emory Chamber Music Society of Atlanta. The concerts are free and open to the Emory community and the public. Please arrive early as these concerts fill up quickly!

This year's series includes:

Friday, September 27
Noon, Reception Hall
The Vega String Quartet perform Twentieth-Century String Quartet Masterpieces including works by Ravel, Bartok, Shostakovich, and Philip Glass.

Thursday, October 24
Noon, Reception Hall
In a program titled Professors of the Practice, violinist Cynthia Patterson, professor of history; cellist Richard Patterson, professor of philosophy; clarinetist Ashraf Attalla, professor of psychology; and pianist Guy Benian, professor of pathology and laboratory medicine, join members of the Vega String Quartet to perform works by Mozart, Dvorak, and Weber.
 
Friday, November 22
Noon, Reception Hall
In a program titled Beethoven in the 90s, the Vega String Quartet perform Beethoven’s op. 95 (String Quartet), 96 (Violin/PianoSonata), 97 (Archduke Trio) and 98.  Tenor Bradley Howard joins the program to sing To the Distant Beloved.
 
Friday, December 6
Noon, Reception Hall
The Vega String Quartet perform a program titled Bach's Lunch.

Friday, January 31
Noon, Reception Hall
Celebrate the Chinese New Year and the start of the Year of the Horse with a program of traditional Chinese music.

Friday, February 14
Noon, Reception Hall
A program of Valentine’s Day Love Songs features instrumental and vocal music of love with tenor Bradley Howard, pianist William Ransom, and the Vega String Quartet

Friday, March 21
Noon, Reception Hall
The Emory Univeristy Symphony Orchestra performs Beethoven's Fifth Symphony.

Friday, April 18
Noon, Reception Hall
Emory's Young Artists program features the university's best undergraduate talent.

Friday, May 9
Noon, Reception Hall
Ransom Notes features Kate Ransom, violin; and William Ransom, piano.
Museum Tours

Public Tours: Members of the Museum's Docent Guild lead public tours of the permanent collection and special exhibitions every Sunday at 2:00 p.m. Tours begin in the Rotunda on Level One of the Museum.

Docent-led tours are available for groups of ten or more by appointment. Please call 404-727-0519 to schedule a tour for your group. Please call at least two weeks in advance.

For special needs tours, please contact Julie Green by phone at 404-727-2363 or by email at jgree09@emory.edu.

Carlos Reads Book Club

Carlos Reads offers an opportunity to read great works of literature related to the Museum's collections and exhibitions in an informal, small group setting with distinguished members of the Emory faculty as a guide. Previous Carlos Reads groups have read Plato's Symposium, Herodotus' Histories, the Qur'an, and Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children, among others. Sign up to read and discuss one book, or many.

Carlos Reads discussions meet on Monday nights, unless otherwise noted, at 7:30 pm in the Board Room on Level Two of the museum. Prices vary according to the number of sessions and always include the cost of the book. Registration is required for each club by calling 404 727-6118 or emailing ehornor@emory.edu.

During the 2013-14 academic year, participants will have the opportunity to read and discuss the following books:


Monday, September 9

Aristophanes' The Birds
THIS PROGRAM IS FULL AND NO ADDITIONAL RESERVATIONS CAN BE ACCEPTED.
Long before e.e. cummings suggested "there's a hell of a good universe next door; let's go," Aristophanes sent two Athenians in search of one.  His Birds asks what it would be like if the bottom of the food chain took over for the gods—or do they really?  Go to the crows (find out what that means!) and put on some wings with Niall W. Slater of Emory's Department of Classics, as we explore one of Aristophanes' masterpieces. Fee: $20 for Carlos Museum members; $25 for non-members and includes the cost of the book.  Space is limited and advance registration is required by calling 404.727.6118.

Monday, October 21
Artemisia

Two women, two artists, two worlds in transition. 20th century writer Anna Banti stumbles upon the story of 17th-century Italian painter Artemisia Gentileschi, daughter of a famous painter, brilliant in her own right yet unknown and unheard of. Though information was scarce, Anna begins to create a presence of this "sister" of centuries before and drafts a manuscript. She imagines Artemisia's struggles as a female artist in a male dominated time and profession and finds kinship in her own efforts as a writer centuries later. The violence of rape that defined Artemisia's life echo the world of violence of Nazi occupied Italy in which Anna lives. Anna is writing in war-torn Florence where the bombing of her home destroys the only copy of her work. Starting over again was an almost impossible task but Artemisia had now taken on a voice and presence of her own and she haunted Anna, driving her to write her story again. This time however, Anna was not writing alone but in a constant state of complement and contrast with Artemisia. The two artists flow together to render a touching and challenging story of parallel lives as female artists living in a world of violence, and most of all needing to find one's own voice in the midst of chaos.
 
In conjunction with the exhibition Antichit√†, Teatro, Magnificenza: Renaissance and Baroque Images of Rome, Judy Raggi Moore of Emory's Italian Department, explores with readers the voices of Anna and Artemisia, of Baroque Rome and Nazi occupied Florence, of writer and painter, of woman and artist as they weave, intersect, and clash across the centuries. Fee: $20 for Carlos Museum members; $25 for non-members and includes the cost of the book.  Space is limited and advance registration is required by calling 404.727.6118.

Monday, November 11
Aztec Poetry
The Aztecs are known for their lyrical poetry, which was sung or chanted before the Spanish invasions and then written down in early Colonial times. Miguel Leon-Portilla's Fifteen Poets of the Aztec World presents their musings on love, nature, the human condition, and the brevity of life. Rebecca Stone, Massie Martin/NEH Distinguished Professor of Art History, will explore with readers the metaphors, subtexts, and context of a few select poems by named poets, including a ruler and a woman. Fee: $20 for Carlos Museum members; $25 for non-members and includes the cost of the book.  Space is limited and advance registration is required by calling 404.727.6118.

In conjunction with the exhibition Romare Bearden: A Black Odyssey, Louise Pratt, chair of the Classics Department, will lead readers though contemporary reinterpretations of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey including:
 
Monday, December 16
The Penelopiad
The Penelopiad, by Canadian author and poet Margaret Atwood, retells the Odyssey from Penelope's point of view, offering a humorous, feminine perspective and reevaluating many of Homer's interpretations of Helen, Penelope, her maidservants and, of course, Odysseus himself.
Fee: $20 for Carlos Museum members; $25 for non-members and includes the cost of the book.  Space is limited and advance registration is required by calling 404.727.6118.

Monday, January 27
Ransom

Ransom, by one of Australia's preeminent novelists, David Malouf, retells the story of Iliad 24, Priam's ransoming of the body of Hector from the hero Achilles. It echoes familiar Homeric themes of war, fatherhood, mortality and humanity, but with modern attention to the internal reflections of both major and minor characters, including the lowly carter who brings Priam to the camp of the Greeks. Fee: $20 for Carlos Museum members; $25 for non-members and includes the cost of the book.  Space is limited and advance registration is required by calling 404.727.6118.

Monday, February 10
Big Fish

Much like the film O Brother Where Art Thou, Big Fish: A Novel of Epic Proportions by North Carolina writer Daniel Wallace offers a very modern take on the Odyssey. The wandering, storytelling, philandering father, now on his deathbed, is considered through the eyes of his less aspiring son. Like the Penelopiad, Big Fish complicates our perspective on Odysseus with humor and imagination. Like Ransom, it examines major themes of father-son relations, mortality, the journey and, of course, storytelling. Fee: $20 for Carlos Museum members; $25 for non-members and includes the cost of the book.  Space is limited and advance registration is required by calling 404.727.6118.

Monday, March 3
L
ost Books of the Odyssey
The Lost Books of the Odyssey
by a computer scientist from California, Zachary Mason, offers multiple perspectives on both the Iliad and the Odyssey by presenting numerous fragmentary vignettes that fundamentally alter and reconsider major episodes in the legends surrounding Odysseus and the Trojan War. Like all of the authors we will read in this series, Mason explores issues of truth and lies in storytelling, of possibility, of family relations, and above all of identity and metaphor. Fee: $20 for Carlos Museum members; $25 for non-members and includes the cost of the book.  Space is limited and advance registration is required by calling 404.727.6118.
 
Monday, April 21
Half of a Yellow Sun

Pamela Scully, of Emory’s Program in African Studies, will lead readers through Half of a Yellow Sun in which Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie explores the relationship between twin sisters of an academic family in the context of late 1960s Nigeria. The novel is set in the lead up to and experience of the Biafran War of 1967,  in which oil-rich southeastern Nigeria tried to secede from the rest of the country.  We will explore relationships between siblings and twins in particular (Professor Scully is herself an identical twin); the African middle class, and how this novel is one of the first to depict this; the history and legacies of the Biafran War; and learn a bit about Chimamanda Adiche, who is a leading novelist of a younger generation pioneering new approaches to writing about Africa in the 21st century.

Fee: $20 for Carlos Museum members; $25 for non-members and includes the cost of the book.  Space is limited and advance registration is required by calling 404.727.6118.
 
Monday, May 5
Cicero

63 BC was the highlight of Marcus Tullius Cicero’s career.  Holding the highest office in Rome, he singlehandedly exposed a dangerous conspiracy within the Roman state in his Catilinarian Orations and in so doing produced his single most significant political, artistic, and rhetorical achievement.  Jonathan Master of Emory’s Classics Department will lead readers through two short works that deal with the conspiracy in which Cicero, using only his political acumen and razor sharp oratory, successfully drives disgruntled high-born Roman citizen, Lucius Sergius Catilina out of the city.  The first text will be Cicero’s first Catilinarian, a dramatic speech in which he confronts the principal conspirator Catiline in the Roman senate.  Our second reading will be Catiline’s War, a historical account of the conspiracy and the eventual defeat of Catiline and his forces in battle, written by Gaius Sallustius Crispus, Cicero’s contemporary and himself a disgraced politician. 
Fee: $25 for Carlos Museum members; $30 for non-members and includes the cost of the book.  Space is limited and advance registration is required by calling 404.727.6118.
 

 

 

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Lectures, Symposia, and Gallery Talks
The Museum's commitment of academic excellence is reflected in the lectures, symposia, and gallery talks presented by the Office of Educational Programs. The Museum draws on the rich resources of the University's faculty and supports Emory's academic mission by bringing nationally and internationally recognized scholars, authors, and artists to campus. Most of these public lectures and symposia are free and all are open to the Emory community and the public. For a listing of upcoming programs, please see the Calendar.
Audio Tours

An MP3 audio tour of highlights of the the permanent collection is available at the Reception Desk on Level One. The MP3 format allows visitors to hear from Museum and University experts at the touch of a button. The guide is available for a rental fee of $2. Museum members enjoy unlimited free usage.

A second audio tour makes connections between the Museum's permanent collections and the times and texts Bible. Curators and faculty members from Emory University's Candler School of Theology and the Departments of Religion and Middle Eastern Studies explore objects in relation to biblical texts to enhance our understanding of the cultures out of which Judaism and Christianity developed. The guide is available for a rental fee of $2. Museum members enjoy unlimited free usage.