Education

The Carlos Museums offers a wide variety of public programs for adults from scholarly symposia to informal Talk & Taste programs. Click on listings below for descriptions of programs below or visit the Museum calendar for specific information on scheduled programs.

Podcasts

The Carlos Museum announces Carlos Conversations, a series of podcasts that use works of art in the Carlos Collection to spark conversations between distinguished members of Emory’s faculty. Developed in conjunction with Antenna Audio, each podcast brings together experts from different disciplines to look at museum objects in new and unusual ways.

Voted "Best Use of New Technology for Exploring Ancient Ideas" in the 2008 "Best of Atlanta" issue of Atlanta Magazine!

Download any podcast to your iPod or any portable mp3 player, bring it to the museum and receive free admission!

Send us your comments about Carlos Conversation podcasts.

Subscribe to our email list for K-12 programs
 
NEW! Tour Native North American Special Exhibitions, Fall 2015
Indigenous Beauty: Masterworks of American Indian Art from the Diker Collection
October 8, 2015 – January 3, 2016
Indigenous Beauty highlights Native North American artists whose visionary creativity and technical mastery have helped preserve cultural values across generations. The exhibition includes artists from many tribes and nations, each the product of complex and intertwined histories. The exhibition shows both the deep historical roots of Native art and its dynamism, emphasizing the living cultures and traditions of Native American groups through to the contemporary era.
 Museum docents, knowledgeable about the works of art and themes in the exhibition as well as the Georgia Performance Standards related to the study of Native North American cultures, will lead students through the exhibition in small groups, exploring the cultural continuity within each region, and the ways in which historical events impacted stylistic shifts over the course of time.
*Students will see beautifully crafted clothing embellished with beads, feathers, and ermine pelts. New materials arriving from Europe including silk, silver ornaments, and glass beads contributed to innovation and technical brilliance in 19th-century ceremonial regalia.

*Extraordinary examples of basketry and ceramic vessels illustrate the continuity of techniques and styles over time and distance.

*Ancient ivories from the Arctic signal ethnic identity, represent ritual objects for burial and regeneration, or serve as beuatifully crafted utilitariian ornaments such as the harpoon counterweight for the hunting of walrus.

*Sculpted masks, rattles, and bowls from the Northwest coast represent venerable stories of the clans used for dances, celebrations, and healing visions.

*19th-century pictographic art captures images of native people hunting and in battle dress, or embodies potent imagery for protection.

Reinforce your students knowledge of Native American cultures and the geography of the First Nations in this special exhibiton.

Spider Woman to Horned Serpent: Creation and Creativity in North American Art
through May 29, 2016
Students will learn about the horned serpent from the Mississippian period and its connection to the feathered serpent from ancient Mesoamerica. Through ceramics, sand paintings, bead and fiber works, students will explore the story of Spider Woman, a foundational tale of creation for the Hopi and Pueblo Nations. Spider Woman taught the people of the Native southwest to weave and grow squash, beans, and corn for food.  As "the Woman of Hard Substances" she gave them silver, turquoise, coral, and shell for adorning themselves in beauty.


 
PLU Course for Teachers, Fall 2015
Arts of Native North America
2015 - 2016 School Year


Teachers who attend three Teacher Workshops and three public lectures (listed below) will be eligible for 1 PLU credit from the Georgia Department of Education.

For informaiton and to register contact Julie Green at jgree09@emory.edu.
Fee $40. 


Workshops, from 5 – 7 pm  Must attend all three
1. Thursday, September 24, The Science of Art Conservation
2. Thursday, October 22, Native American Fiction for the Classroom
3. Thursday, October 29, Arts of Native North America from Ancient Arctic to Contemporary Muscogee
 
Public Lectures, choose three from the list below
1.  Sunday, October 18, 4 pm, Nix Mann Endowed Lecture with Native artist, Tammy Garcia.
2. Tuesday, October 20, 7:30 pm, Trade and Transformation in American Indian Arts of Eastern North America with David Penney, Director of Museum Scholarship at the National Museum of the American Indian.
3. Tuesday, October 27, 7:30 pm,  The Plains Indians —Artist of Earth and Sky, with Gaylord Torrence, Senior Curator of American Indian Art at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.
4. Sunday, November 1, 2 pm, Panel Discussion with three renowned Native American scholars discussing their community-driven research:  Craig Womack, LeAnne Howe, and Jace Weaver.
5. Tuesday, November 10, 7:30, The War the Slaveholders Won: Indian Removal and the State of Georgia with Claudio Saunt, Richard B. Russell Professor of American History and Associate Director of the Institute of Native American Studies at the University of Georgia.
6. Tuesday, November 17, 7:30 pm, Art and Ritual Process among Northern Northwest Coast First Nations with Dr. Barbara Brotherton, curator of Native American Art at the Seattle Museum of Art.


To register contact Julie Green at jgree09@emory.edu or call direct at 404-727-2363.




Odyssey Online
The Carlos Museum's interactive website for kids continues to grow and expand. Thanks to the generous financial support of the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, the Carlos is pleased to present Odyssey Online: South Asia, a web-based resource for upper elementary, middle, and high school students that uses engaging interactive technology to explore works of art in the museum's collection in depth, and to provide an understanding of how similar objects function in relgious contexts in India and here in Atlanta.  

Students may explore a 13th-century gilt Buddha from Tibet in the museum's collection, and then explore a similar one, with the help of a Tibetan Buddhist monk, on the altar at Atlanta's Drepung Loseling Monastery. They can also study a sandstone image of the elephant-headed deity, Ganesha, and then witness a ritual that happens every Saturday morning at the Hindu Temple of Atlanta in which the deity is annointed with auspicious substances, dressed and ornaments, providing students with an understanding of how such sculptures function in a religious context.

Be sure to explore other engaging sections of Odyssey Online:

Odyssey Online: Greece, designed for elementary students  








Odyssey Online: Ancient Americas, designed for upper elementary and middle school students. 








Special Family Events

Tenth Anniversary of Mummies and Milkshakes!

Friday, October 30, 6–9:30 pm 
Reception Hall, Level Three

The Carlos Museum and Jake’s Ice Cream present the 10th annual Mummies and Milkshakes. Visit animal and human mummies in the Egyptian galleries, choose your favorite flavor for a milkshake, and watch funny vintage mummy cartoons and the hilarious Three Stooges short, We Want Our Mummy, followed by Abbot and Costello Meet the Mummy.

Come in your Halloween costume! Milkshakes for sale beginning at 6:30 pm, cartoons at 7 pm, film begins at 7:45 pm. Docents will be in the Egyptian galleries from 6:30 to 7:30 pm to tour families and answer questions.

Free for Carlos Museum members; $5 for non-members. Milkshakes sold separately. Space is limited. Registration is required by contacting Alyson Vuley at 404.727.0519 or avuley@emory.edu 



Abenaki Storytelling and Musical Event with Joseph Bruchac

Sunday, December 6, 2 pm 
Reception Hall, Level Three


Joseph Bruchac is coming to the Carlos Museum! Bruchac is a prolific writer with many beautiful children’s books to his credit, including The First Strawberries and Between Earth and Sky: Legends of Native American Sacred Places. His critically acclaimed, best-selling Keepers of the Earth: Native American Stories and Environmental Activities for Children and others of his Keepers series integrates science and folklore. Bruchac is also a Native North American scholar, collector of myths and legends, preserver of Abenaki culture, poet, musician, educator, and perhaps most of all, extraordinary storyteller. He will spend a Sunday afternoon with families sharing his stories and traditional Abenaki songs and instruments. The Carlos Museum bookstore will be offering a variety of Bruchac’s books for sale at the event. 

Support for educational programs for children and families at the Carlos Museum comes from the David R. Clare and Margaret C. Clare Foundation.


University Classes that Use the Collections of the Carlos

FALL SEMESTER 2015

ARTHIST485
M/W
Dr. Rebecca Stone

A large and wide-ranging travelling exhibition of art from all over Native North America will open in October, 2015, at the Carlos Museum. Titled "Indigenous Beauty" and containing over one hundred works from the Arctic, Northwest Coast, California, Southwest, Plains, and Eastern Woodlands peoples, it will be the focus of this seminar. The course includes overviews of each of these areas and then specific concentration on selected works in the show. Students are not expected to have a background in this area, but be able to conduct higher-level individual research and to talk to the class on chosen works. Museology (the study of the theory and practice of museums) is integral to the seminar.

Image: Tunic and Leggings, late 19th century, Tlingit, Chilkat, Klukwan, Alaska. Cedar bark, wool, metal cones.  Diker no. 795.


ARTHIS 729
Tuesday, 3-6 pm
Urbs and Image: Early Modern Engagements with Ancient Rome

Dr. Eric Varner
Pirro Ligorio’s Anteique Urbis Imago of 1561 stands as the first scholarly attempt to reconstruct ancient Rome. Meticulously researched, Ligorio’s reconstruction is based on the close study of existing ruins, coins, ancient texts and 16th century archaeological discoveries.  This seminar will explore the monuments and topography of the ancient city using Emory’s rare 1773 twelve-plate copy of Ligorio’s map and related materials in the Michael C. Carlos Museum and the Manuscript Archives and Rare Book Library.   The seminar will also be working closely with Emory’s digital platform for the map (“Views of Rome’), creating new interactive features for individual monuments featured in Ligorio’s reconstruction.
 

ARTHIS 387/ 592
Issues in the Conservation of Art and Cultural Property

Reneé Stein
This course will provide an introduction to the field of Art Conservation as well as an overview of the principle issues surrounding the care and preservation of cultural properties. Lecture and discussion will address historic materials and technologies, as well as aging properties, deterioration, and conservation treatment. Examples will be drawn from a wide variety of cultures and will represent diverse media, including paper, paintings, stone, metals, ceramics, archaeological remains, and historic monuments. We will examine the use of science to recognize fakes or forgeries, document artists' working methods, and identify historic materials. Discussions will consider issues of aesthetics, artist’s intent, change over time, and compensation for loss or damage.


ARTHIS 319
Kingship in Ancient Egypt
MW, 2:30-3:45 pm

Dr. Gay Robins
Have you ever wondered why the ruler of ancient Egypt is often referred to as a god-king? Does it seem absurd to you that a human being could be regarded as a god? In this class we will explore ancient Egyptian ideas about the king and the office of kingship in order to understand how a mortal king could also be in some sense divine. The ideology of kingship and the duties it imposed upon the king are reflected in much of the representational material surviving from ancient Egypt. We will examine how the Egyptians expressed their ideas about kingship visually, where these images were displayed, what their function was, who the intended audiences might have been, and what this tells us about the divine status of the king. The course will include visits to the Carlos Museum. Class attendance is required.

ARTHIS 719
Ancient Egyptian Art and Hieroglyphs
TH, 9 am - Noon

Dr. Gay Robins
Egyptian hieroglyphs form a pictorial script used on monuments, in contrast to the cursive, non-pictorial hieratic and demotic scripts employed on official and literary documents written on papyrus. Hieroglyphs, created according to the same principles that underlie two-dimensional Egyptian art, are a fundamental element in Egyptian representations. Not only do they serve to identify figures and actions, but they are an integral part of the whole composition. This course explores the form, function and symbolism of this beautiful script and its relationship to Egyptian art, and introduces students to the basic grammar of Middle Egyptian, the classical language of ancient Egypt, to enable them to read standard monumental inscriptions. Sessions will include language exercises, reading of prepared and unprepared texts, analysis of monumental scenes and their associated texts, discussions of readings, Carlos Museum visits, and short presentations and papers.

Information for Faculty

The collections of the Michael C. Carlos Museum represent an important curricular resource for Emory faculty. Comprised of over 16,000 works from the ancient Near East, Egypt, Greece, the ancient Americas, sub-Saharan Africa, and works on paper from the middle ages to the present, the collections offer unique opportunities to engage students in discussions about original works of art and the civilizations that produced them.

The galleries provide an intimate setting for “out of the classroom” teaching. The diverse collections provide points of connection with a variety of disciplines and unique opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration. Faculty in art history, classics, religion, creative writing, dance, anthropology, and the sciences use the collections regularly in their teaching. The Museum encourages faculty from all disciplines to take advantage of the teaching opportunities available in the galleries and in the Museum’s classroom space using objects and works on paper from storage.

Guided and self-guided tours for students are available by calling 404 727-0519. Members of the Museum staff are available to help create connections between the Museum’s collections and exhibitions and coursework.

The Museum works with academic departments on campus to develop public programs of interest to the academic community. For a complete listing of these programs, please see the Calendar.

AntiquiTEA
A civilized learning experience. Enjoy afternoon tea and scones as museum curators and Emory faculty members and graduate students discuss works of art in the collections and exhibitions.
 

Thursday, September 17
4 pm, Reception Hall, Level Three

Though ancient Egyptian civilization collapsed millennia ago, its arts continue to thrive in unexpected places. What does it mean when artists like Kara Walker and Matthew Barney use Egyptian imagery in their work? Enjoy afternoon tea and scones as Rachel Kreiter, a doctoral candidate in art history, discusses ancient Egyptian influences in contemporary art using examples from the Carlos collection to illustrate the pharaonic sources artists are looking to for inspiration in the 21st century.

Thursday, October 15
4 pm Reception Hall, Level Three

When Native North Americans were confronted with the European weapon of choice, the rifle, they not only mastered the use of it, but also turned it on its head, literally, to change its form into one of
their traditional weapons, the war club, sending a strong message of retaliation and determination to maintain their ways of living. Laura Wingfield, assistant curator of art of the Americas, discusses the gun/war club as a work of art and a political statement for many Native American groups.
Image: Ball-head Club with Gun Form. Anishinaabe, Ojibwa, Wisconsin or Minnesota, ca. 1820. Wood. Diker no. 851


Thursday, November 12
4 pm,  Reception Hall, Level Three

Displaying Native North American art has social and political ramifications, given the long, negative history between the indigenous peoples and the U.S. government. The inclusion of Hopi “kachina” figures is a case in point. While some tribal members see them as commodities, others follow the traditional belief that they are spirits, their roles secret, and no one outside of initiates should see them; this impacts whether 19th-century katsinam can be ethically shown in a museum setting. Rebecca Stone, faculty curator of Art of the Americas, discusses various viewpoints on the issue and other curatorial issues related to Indigenous Beauty.
 

Thursday, December 3
4 pm, Reception Hall, Level Three

The exhibition Indigenous Beauty includes a large ink drawing from 1920 depicting The Battle of Little Big Horn by Luther Standing Bear. Enjoy afternoon tea and scones as Michael Elliott, Executive Associate Dean of Emory College and author of Custerology: The Enduring Legacy of the Indian Wars and George Armstrong Custer, discusses the contested legacy of both. 

Image: Detail from Standing Bear (Lakota, 1859-1933) Pine Ridge, South Dakota. The Battle of LIttle Big Horn, ca. 1920. Pencil, pen and ink on muslin. Diker no. 652.

Artful Stories at the Museum

When ancient art, great stories, and inquisitive children are brought together something exciting happens and young imaginations flourish! This program is for children three to five years old accompanied by a parent or other adult. Once a month on select Saturdays, children will be able to sit in the galleries surrounded by works of art and hear stories of ancient Greece and Rome, Egypt, Asia, the Americas, and Africa. After the story, children and their companions will move to the Tate Room to create works of art or participate in activities based on the story and the cultures represented in the Carlos' collections.

For ages 3 to 5 years and accompanying adults. These programs are free but space is limited.  A reservation is required by calling Alyson Vuley at 404.727.0519.
 

Artful Stories: Mummy Cat Author Event
Friday, September 4, 10 am 
Reception Hall, Level Three

The Carlos Museum welcomes Marcus Ewert and Lisa Brown, author and illustrator of the charming new book Mummy Cat. Projecting images and text from Mummy Cat on the big screen, Ewert and Brown will share their story, their affection for the world of ancient Egypt, and a secret “story within a story” with children ages 3 to 5, followed by a hands-on activity.  

THIS EVENT HAS FILLED.




 

Artful Stories: Ganesha’s Sweet Tooth
Saturday, September 19, 10 am 
Asian Galleries, Level One


Children will hear the story Ganesha’s Sweet Tooth, by Pixar animator Sanjay Patel, under the friendly gaze and round belly of the museum’s 9th-century sandstone image of Ganesha. After the story, children will create “leaf Ganeshas” while enjoying his favorite treat, laddoos! 

 

Artful Stories: Storm Boy
Saturday, October 17, 10 am
Exhibition Galleries, Level Three


Children will experience a journey beneath the sea with a Haida prince in Owen Paul Lewis’ beautiful picture book, Storm Boy, before exploring the animal-form clappers and rattles made by the people of the Pacific Northwest in the exhibition Indigenous Beauty. Children will then create orca collages inspired by Haida imagery. 






 

Artful Stories: Tasunka: A Lakota Horse Legend 
Saturday, November 7, 10 am 
Exhibition Galleries, Level Three


Children will learn about the pictographic art of the Plains peoples in Tasunka, written and illustrated in the ledger art style by Donald F. Montileaux (Lakota). Children will compare Joseph No Two Horn’s thunderbird shield, made with hide and natural pigments, to a ledger art drawing by Swift Dog (Lakota) of Joseph No Two Horns riding his horse and carrying the same shield. Children will then make their own pictorial shields. 







The Artful Stories program is made possible through the generous support of PNC Bank and the David R. Clare and Margaret C. Clare Foundation.

Workshops for Teachers, Fall 2015

Teachers tell us that the workshops and PLU courses at the Carlos Museum are unique. They value these programs because of the engaging content and the opportunity to work in small groups with scholars and artists who are not only experts in their areas, but masterful and generous instructors. Join us this academic year for a rich mix of workshops that range from explorations in the galleries with Emory faculty and curators, to hands-on art experiences with guest artists. 

Workshops will be held from 5-7 pm and will meet in the Tate Room on the Plaza Level. Unless otherwise noted the fee is $8 for museum members and $12 for non-members.  To register, contact Julie Green at jgree09@emory.edu.

Ganesha and the NEW Odyssey Online South Asia Website
Thursday, September 17, 5 pm 
Tate Room, Plaza Level


On September 17 in many parts of India, a ten-day festival known as Ganesha Chaturthi begins, a celebration of one of the most beloved Hindu deities, Ganesha, the “Lord of New Beginnings” and the “Remover of Obstacles”. Joyce Flueckiger, professor in Emory’s Department of Religion, explores the narratives related to the elephant-headed god, forms of worship practiced here in India and here in Atlanta,  and the museum’s new Odyssey Online: South Asia website, which provides teachers an engaging way to introduce their students to Ganesha though interactive exploration and video. Teachers will also learn how to make traditional clay and leaf images of Ganesha, easily adapted for the classroom.


 

The Science of Art Conservation
Thursday, September 24, 5 pm 
Tate Room, Plaza Level

Join Chief Conservator Renée Stein in a steam-related preview of the museum’s new Conservation in the Carlos tour for students. This tour introduces the many ways that science is employed in the study and preservation of works of art from preventative care to treatment and research. Teachers will be engaged in the “Habits of Mind” outlined in Georgia Performance Standards as they tour the galleries with Ms. Stein. As they explore objects in every area of the museum, iPad technology will allow them to examine the condition of objects prior to treatment, as well as conservation treatments in progress. Science and art conservation resources for teachers are available.  Click on web resources.





 

Native American Fiction for the Classroom
Thursday, October 22, 5 pm
Tate Room, Plaza Level

Mandy Suhr-Sytsma, lecturer in the English Department at Emory, will introduce teachers to resources for finding and evaluating children’s and young adult books by Native American authors. She will also highlight specific titles, ranging from picture books to teen fiction, by writers whose communities are represented in Indigenous Beauty. She will share ideas for incorporating these texts into the classroom. 

 

Arts of Native North America from Ancient Arctic to Contemporary Muscogee
Thursday, October 29, 5 pm
Tate Room, Plaza Level

Assistant Curator of Art of the Americas, Laura Wingfield, will lead teachers through 2,000 years of Amerindian art, from Arctic ivories to Western basketry, Southwestern pottery through Plains leather and beadwork, to Eastern Woodlands sculptures and regalia in two exhibitions on view at the Carlos this fall, Indigenous Beauty and Spider Woman to Horned Serpent: Creation and Creativity in Native North American Art. Connections to the Georgia Performance Standards will be emphasized.


 


NEW! The Science Behind Art Conservation Tour

The Science Behind Art Conservation
Appropriate for Fourth Grade to High School

In this exciting new tour developed with the guidance and expertise of the museum's Chief Conservator, students will explore the many ways that science is employed in the study and preservation of works of art. Museum docents will introduce students to art conservation practices focusing on preventative care, treatment, and research.  Digital images on iPads will provide students the opportunity to examine the condition of objects prior to conservation treatment, as well as images of treatment in progress. In this very interactive tour, students will be able to handle examples of materials used to make and conserve art, including fabrics used to stabilize the mummies. They will see beyond what is visible to the museum visitor. For example, in the Egyptian galleries they will get a glimpse into the creative process of the artist through modern, microscopic analysis where a cross section of the paint surface from 1075 BC reveals a substructure of mud applied below the layers of under painting.  Students will be able to see how salt crystals in porous materials such as ceramics or stone can cause damage that may destroy the surface and weaken the structure and the treatment that was performed.

Students will practice the Habits of Mind teaching goals as they:
*Ask questions that lead to investigations
*Use charts and graphs
*Use data to answer questions
*Identify patterns of change
*Research and gather information
*Understand the importance of safety concerns
Andrew W. Mellon Internships

Thanks to the generosity of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Michael C. Carlos Museum offers paid summer internships for Emory University students. Graduate and undergraduate students with strong interest in and aptitude for museum work may gain experience to augment their academic program. Three interns will be selected by a committee of Museum staff and faculty advisors. The internships are ten weeks in length, and students are paid $5,000. Thanks to the generosity of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, three Emory graduate students are working with curators on exciting research projects this summer. 
 
Between 2002 and 2008, a number of decorated ceramic vases and a great many fragments of others were donated to the Michael C. Carlos Museum by Dr. Dietrich von Bothmer, for decades curator of Greek and Roman Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the leading connoisseur of Greek pottery of his generation. Most are Attic black- and red-figure, but there are also some in coral red as well as Laconian and Etruscan black figure and Apulian and Campanian red-figure. Taken together, these constitute a significant contribution to the classical collections at the Carlos. Julianne Cheng is working with the Curator of Greek and Roman Art, Dr Jasper Gaunt, to lay the foundations for a catalogue of this material.  Her internship includes both intensive hands-on study and documentation of the sherds themselves; and library and online research to address topics as they arise, mostly relating to shape, subject, iconography, style, inscriptions, technique and related matters.

The project in the Art of the Americas collection revolves around the planned 2017 exhibition Threads of Time: Tradition and Change in Indigenous American Textiles. Edward Besse is working with Dr. Laura Wingfield, assistant curator of Art of the Americas, to research Maya textiles for the development of in gallery labels and other materials.

Amy Butner is working with the museum's Curator of ancient Egyptian, Nubian, and Near Eastern Art, Dr. Melinda Hartwig, on a number of projects related to the collection, from the construction of object reference folders by case/vitrine; organizing current donor files; and the tracing of object provenance to be entered into the museum's object data base, TMS.  The intern will also work with Dr. Hartwig and Elizabeth Hornor, Marguerite Colville Ingram Director of Education, on the development of a family guide for the Egyptian collections.

The Carlos Museum also offers unpaid internships, often for credit, and other opportunities for working and learning in a museum environment for Emory students. For more information about internships, contact Elizabeth Hornor by phone at 404-727-6118, or by email at ehornor@emory.edu.

Homeschool Day, Fall 2015

Native North American Homeschool Day at the Carlos
Friday, November 20, Noon 
Rotunda, Level One

Homeschool students and parents are invited to participate in an exciting afternoon of exploration in Indigenous Beauty: Masterworks of American Indian Art from the Diker Collection. Museum docents will tour groups through the exhibition featuring works of art by tribes and First Nations from across the North American continent. In the exhibition, families will work with maps by artist Aaron Carapella (Cherokee), who, dissatisfied with the maps created by non-Native cartographers, made his own to reflect pre-contact cultures and Native place and tribe names. In the exhibition and in the studio, students will explore ledger paintings, a form of Plains Indian narrative art often depicting personal and group histories such as hunting and battle scenes. The term comes from the accounting ledger books that became a source for paper after the buffalo were wiped out and their hides were no longer available to Plains artists.  

For ages 6 to 16 years. Fee: $10 for Carlos museum members; $12 for non-members.  Payment and registration must be made in advance.  Space is limited.  Please register by contacting Ana Vizurraga  ana.vizurraga@emory.edu
Museum Tours

PUBLIC TOURS: Members of the Museum's Docent Guild lead public tours of the permanent collection and special exhibitions every Sunday at 2:00 p.m. Tours begin in the Rotunda on Level One of the Museum.

Docent-led tours are available for groups of ten or more by appointment. Please call 404-727-0519 to schedule a tour for your group. Please call at least two weeks in advance.
 

AUDIO TOURS

Highlights of the Collection Audio Tour
Thanks to the generous financial support of the Sara Giles Moore Foundation, the Carlos Museum is pleased to introduce an updated audio guide to the permanent collections. The guides include fifty minutes of new material, featuring expert commentary from museum curators and Emory faculty members from a number of departments at the University. The guides available on iPod touches, feature enhanced multimedia content offering visitors a greater understanding of the Carlos Museum’s permanent collection. For example, in the Art of the Americas section, images of whale sharks on the screen help visitors visualize the ways in which the Museum’s Chancay female effigy vessel represents the shaman transforming into the giant fish, which serves as her animal spirit companion. The guide is available for a rental fee of $3. It is included in the general audio tour rental. Carlos Museum members enjoy unlimited free usage.

Times and Texts of the Bible Audio Tour

A second audio tour makes connections between the Museum's permanent collections and the Bible. Curators and faculty members from Emory University's Candler School of Theology and the Departments of Religion and Middle Eastern Studies explore objects in relation to biblical texts to enhance our understanding of the cultures out of which Judaism and Christianity developed. The guide is available for a rental fee of $3. It is included in the general audio tour rental. Museum members enjoy unlimited free usage.

MUSEUM MOMENTS TOURS
Museum Moments is a tour designed for people with mild cognitive impairment or dementia and is based on the successful Meet Me program developed by the Museum of Modern Art. Experiencing the art of the ancient world at the Carlos Museum can spark the imagination, trigger memories, and encourage a shared experience in a beautiful setting. Individuals with mild cognitive impairment, early Alzheimer’s or dementia are invited to attend Museum Moments tours with their family member or a caregiver. To schedule a time contact Julie Green at 404-727-2363.

Stools for this program were made possible by a gift from Sylvia Dodson in memory of her husband, James Dodson.

Museum Recognized for Innovative Faculty Collaborations

The Office of the Provost has recognized the Carlos Museum for its commitment to innovative faculty collaborations and to public education. Read the article below and watch the video here.

In the beginning was a mummy. And not just any mummy, but, in fact, the oldest Egyptian mummy in the Western Hemisphere, one of only seven in the world. Emory's Old Kingdom mummy was the first inventoried object (1921.1) in the collection of the Michael C. Carlos Museum. A massive conservation effort in 2011 drew on a university-wide team of conservationists, faculty, and students to restore the Old Kingdom mummy, which now holds a special place in the permanent collection of the Carlos Museum.

However, beyond this one rare and special object, the Carlos opens up a broader treasure chest to Emory -- one intrinsically tied to the university's mission to "create, preserve, teach, and apply knowledge in the service of humanity." Recognizing the importance of the museum to academic life, Emory's strategic plan, Where Courageous Inquiry Leads, focused one of its framing principles on Creativity: Arts and Innovation. That emphasis -- along with Courageous Inquiry initiatives on strengthening faculty distinction, enhancing the student experience, creating community, and religions and the human spirit -- has helped the Carlos grow even stronger in its support of academics.

Read the full article: View/Download
Read Courageous Inquiry Chronicle: View/Download

Evening for Educators, Fall 2015

Indigenous Beauty: Masterworks of American Indian Art from the Diker Collection
Friday, October 16, 5 pm
Reception Hall, Level Three

K–12 educators are invited to a special viewing of Indigenous Beauty. At 5:30 pm, Rebecca Stone, Masse-Martin/neh Distinguished Teaching Professor at Emory, will introduce the main themes and highlight objects in the exhibition. Enjoy wine and hors d’oeuvres, sign up for door prizes, and delight in the splendid objects represented in this encyclopedic selection of American Indian masterpieces.

This program is free, but registration is required by contacting Julie Green at 404-727-2363 or jgree09@emory.edu


Chamber Music Concerts
The Office of Educational presents a series of noontime chamber music concerts performed by members and guests of the Emory Chamber Music Society of Atlanta. The concerts are free and open to the Emory community and the public. Please arrive early as these concerts fill up quickly!

Friday, September 18
Noon, Reception Hall, Level Three

Jessica Wu, viola; Guang Wang, cello, and William Ransom, piano perform Beethoven's Piano Trio No. 1 and Cello Sonata No. 1.  

Friday, October 23
Noon, Reception Hall, Level Three

William Fitzpatrick, violin; and William Ransom, piano perform sonatas by Edvard Grieg and Maurice Ravel. 

Friday, November 13
Noon, Reception Hall, Level Three

Emory's best undergraduate talent perform.

Friday, December 11
Noon, Reception Hall, Level Three

Kate Ransom, violin, and William Ransom, piano, perform Cesar Franck’s beautiful Sonata in A Major

Friday, January 22
Noon, Reception Hall, Level Three

Franz Schubert’s great song cycle, Winterreisse, cycle sung by bass Daniel Cole, with William
Ransom, piano.

Friday, February 12
Noon, Reception Hall, Level Three

Tenor Bradley Howard and soprano Abigail Santos Villalobos perform Valentine's Day Love Songs with Erika Tazawa, piano.

Friday, March 4
Noon, Reception Hall, Level Three

Ludwig van Beethoven’s Piano Sonata, op. 110, and Cello Sonata in A, Franz Schubert’s
Impromptu in G-flat with pianist Elena Cholakova and Guang Wang on cello.

Friday, April 1
Noon, Reception Hall, Level Three

A rare performance of B.la Bartok’s early Piano Quintet with Spanish pianist Leopoldo Erice and the Vega String Quartet—sponsored by the Friends of Music at Emory.

Friday, April 29
Noon, Reception Hall, Level Three

David Coucheron, violin and William Ransom, piano perform Camille Saint-Sans’s brilliant
Sonata in D Minor.  








Student Research Blogs
Graduate student Shelly Burian is documenting the process of recreating a Wari textile. The project has grown out of her research with Curator of the Art of the Americas, Dr. Rebecca Stone, as well as a life-long interest in dyeing and weaving.  The final textile will be featured in the exhibition Threads of Time: Tradition and Change in Indigenous American Textiles, which opens at the Carlos Museum iin 2017.  Follow the blog here.
Access to Images in the Carlos Museum Collections
Over 1,000 high resolution images of works of art in the Carlos Museum's collections are available online through a web-based, searchable database called Luna. Browse the collection or, log in with an Emory user id and password to create "media groups" and export images into presentation programs such as PowerPoint and Keynote, as well as social media programs. Information on using Luna is available here.
Children's Workshops

Children’s Workshop: Clay Ganeshas

Sunday, September 13, 2–4 pm
Tate Room, Plaza Level


During the ten-day festival of Ganesha Chaturthi in India, clay images of Ganesha, the elephant-headed Hindu deity, are adorned, offered special foods and incense, and worshipped before being submersed in water on the eleventh day. Artist Gauri Misra-Deshpande will teach children how to make their own Ganeshas in clay. Ages 9 to 12







Children’s Workshop: Rangolis
Sunday, September 20, 2–4 pm 
Tate Room, Plaza Level


In India, the practice of creating a rangoli threshold design can be a daily ritual to welcome happiness into your home or an elaborate artistic endeavor to honor a deity during a special festival. Children will create traditional temporary rangolis with artist Gauri Misra-Deshpande. Ages 6 to 8.


Image: Sadaphuli from the Garden by Geeta Harish from Rangoli: Stories from Goa.

 

Children’s Workshop: Eastern Woodland Fire Pouches and Shoulder Bags
Sunday, October 18, 2–4 pm 
Tate Room, Plaza Level


Children will compare the motifs and styles of the fire pouches and shoulder bags of the Anishinaabe, Seminole, and Muscogee as they evolved from being crafted exclusively with locally available materials to utilizing glass beads, wool, silk ribbon, and silver ornaments acquired in trade with Europeans. Children will create their own bags and bead their origi- nal designs with artist Marie DeGeorge. Ages 9 to 12



Children’s Workshop: Tlingit Animal Totems
Sunday, October 25, 2–4 pm
Tate Room, Plaza Level


Stylized but recognizable crest creatures show clan membership, a vital aspect of many Northwest Coast cultures. Children will explore the crest animals on Tlingit and Tsimshian objects in the special exhibition as well as images of interior house posts and freestanding poles carved with clan-specific animals. Children will then create their own paper “totems” using animals that represent themselves and their families with artist, Ande Cook. Ages 6 to 8.









Children’s Workshop: Rhonda Holy Bear’s Regalia
Sunday, November 8, 2–4 pm
Tate Room, Plaza Level


Rhonda Holy Bear (Lakota) is one of the most important Plains artists working today. Children will examine Maternal Journey, Holy Bear’s sculpture of an Absáalooke woman, her children, and her horses—all adorned with intricately crafted regalia—and then collaborate on a drawing to illustrate their observations. Ages 6–8


Children’s Workshop: Yup’ik Masks
Sunday, November 22, 2–4 pm 
Tate Room, Plaza Level


Arctic peoples of coastal Alaska share the belief that there are many types of people—human people, animal people, and other-than-human people—mysterious beings represented in the beautiful composite masks and dance ornaments they made. Teaching artist Pam Beagle-Daresta will lead children on an exploration of these objects and their special meaning to the Yup’ik and Alutiiq people of the North before making their own mask in the studio. Ages 9 to 12.

 





Fee for Children's Workshops: $15 for Carlos Museum members; $20 for non-members. Registration is required by contacting Alyson Vuley at 404-727-0519 or avuley@emory.edu.


Support for workshops for children and families at the Carlos Museum comes from the David R. Clare and Margaret C. Clare Foundation.
How to Schedule a Tour for Your Homeschool Group

The Michael C. Carlos Museum welcomes homeschool school groups to explore the Museum's collections and special exhibitions with members of the Museum's Docent Guild.

To schedule a guided tour, download the new Tour Reservation Request Form, which can be filled out and returned to the Museum by email to avuley@emory.edu or by fax to 404-727-4292. After typing information into the form please click the SAVE button at the end of the form.

Once your tour request form is received, you will be contacted by Office of Educational Programs staff to confirm your tour. Your tour is not confirmed simply by submitting the request form, but only when you have received an email confirmation and invoice.

Tour Times: Tours are offered Tuesday through Friday at 10 a.m., 11 a.m., noon and 1 p.m.
Group Size: Maximum number is 65 guests per hour. Groups larger than 65 may schedule back to back tours.
Length of Tour: 50 minutes.
Chaperones: One per every ten students required.
Fees: Visits are $6 per student. One chaperone for every ten students is free. Additional adults are $7 each. Children five and under are free.
Confirmation: You will receive an email confirming your tour date and time and invoicing you for payment.
Elementary School Curriculum Based Tours

Objects Have Stories to Tell:  Shapes and Symbols.  Designed for the young visitor, the students explore objects by looking for shapes and symbols of diverse cultures. With specially trained docent guidies, students will find spiral patterns on the giant Greek pythos. Are they a clue to what used to be inside? With clipboards in hand the students will collect all manner of shapes and symbols while exploring cultures from long ago. From ancient Nubia they will find the fly worn by soldiers as a symbol of persistence. They will learn about Athena, the Greek god of wisdom, courage, and the arts, and her symbol the wise owl.  From the ancient Americas they will see the jaguar, a symbol of power and decorate their skin with roller stamp designs seen in the effigies. Introduce your young students to the stories that the objects tell through shapes and symbols at the Carlos Museum.

Resources for Objects Have Stories to Tell:
PDF Kindergarten Standards


Archaeology. CSI: Cultural Scene Investigation. As they explore the galleries, students will learn about pioneering archaeologists like Kathleen Kenyon and the development of stratigraphy at the ancient site of Jericho. They will discover the excitement of analyzing artifacts once they have come out of the ground, from Egyptian mummies and coffins to sculpture, pottery, and jewelry from ancient Greece. Your students will put STEAM into practice as they learn the role of x-rays, chemical analysis, carbon-14 dating, and other scientific techniques that contribute to an archaeologist’s understanding of material culture.

Resources for Archeology:
PDF Georgia Standards


RIck Riordan@ the Carlos. The Carlos collections abound with images from favorite mythological stories. In this tour students experience the Greek myths through Rick Riodan's engaging charcters from the Percy Jackson series. See Aphrodite and Athena,  Apollo and his twin sister Artemis.  The Cyclops, Poseidon, and Grover the satyr are in residence in the permanent collection galleries. In the Egyptian collection, the characters from The Red Pyramid series comes to life as students explore images on coffins and tomb sculpture including Anubis, Osiris (Julius), Sekmet, and a magic wand. Students will visit the 'weighing of the heart' and find the horned viper and Apophis, the serpent god of the Underworld. Students will explore character, plot, and setting, but also the larger meanings that the myths had for the cultures that developed them.

Majority Rules. Developed by museum staff and 3rd grade teachers under a grant by the Georgia Humanities Council, this interactive tour for elementary students is aligned with the Georgia Performance Standards for 3rd grade. It introduces students to 5th-century Athens during the construction of the Parthenon and the development of the roots of democracy. The stories on ancient Greek vases depict scenes from the classics of Greek literature from the Trojan War to Odysseus’ voyage; the stories that are the exemplar of excellence and honor. Students will dress in a chiton and learn what it meant to be a Greek citizen; they will wear the olive wreath of the victorious Olympic athlete; and they will barter with blow-up versions of coins from the collection. See below for the Greek Passport booklet for students, Majority Rules vocabulary, and a follow up lesson plan.




Subscribe to our Email List for Homeschool Programs
 
Funding Your Museum Visit and Bus Transportation

Need help funding transportation for a Museum visit?

A generous member of the Carlos Museum's Advisory Board has given funding to support the cost of bus transportation to the Museum for Title I schools.  K-12 teachers may receive up to $300 towards the cost of bus transporation.  Contact Julie Green at 404.727.2363 or jgree09@emory.edu to apply. Funding will be awarded on a first-come, first-served basis. 

Target provides grants that allow teachers and students to learn in all kinds of settings. To apply for a Field Trip Grant go to www.corporate.target.com/corporate-responsiblity/grants.

Student Docent Program

Undergraduate and graduate students are invited to join the Museum's Docent Guild to give tours to K-12 groups, students, and the general public. Each fall new student docents are recruited and receive training on the collections. They begin touring in the spring. This provides students an excellent opportunity to develop research and presenation skills. For more information, contact Julie Green at 404-727-2363 or jgree09@emory.edu.

Audio Tours
Thanks to the generous financial support of the Sara Giles Moore Foundation, the Carlos Museum is pleased to introduce an updated audio guide to the permanent collections. The guides include fifty minutes of new material, featuring expert commentary from museum curators and Emory faculty members from a number of departments at the University. The guides available on iPod touches, feature enhanced multimedia content offering visitors a greater understanding of the Carlos Museum’s permanent collection. For example, in the Art of the Americas section, images of whale sharks on the screen help visitors visualize the ways in which the Museum’s Chancay female effigy vessel represents the shaman transforming into the giant fish, which serves as her animal spirit companion. 

The audio guides may be rented for $3 at the Information Desk in the Museum rotunda and, as always, audio guides are free to Carlos Museum members.

A second audio tour makes connections between the Museum's permanent collections and the times and texts Bible. Curators and faculty members from Emory University's Candler School of Theology and the Departments of Religion and Middle Eastern Studies explore objects in relation to biblical texts to enhance our understanding of the cultures out of which Judaism and Christianity developed. The guide is available for a rental fee of $2. Museum members enjoy unlimited free usage.

Teen Programs

Teen Art Workshop: Haida Manga and Formline Design
Friday, October 23, 6–8 pm 
Foyer, Level Three


Teens will discover the ancient origins and 19th-century refinements of the formline aesthetic of the Pacific Northwest featured in the special exhibition Indigenous Beauty. This art form continues to evolve in the work of contemporary sculptors like Preston Singletary (Tlingit) and graphic artist Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas (Haida), the creator of the new genre “Haida Manga.” Artist Joseph R. Wheeler III will instruct teens in the “Haida Manga” style. Ages 13 to 17


 

Carlos Reads YA! Wabanaki Blues
Friday, November 13, 6 pm
Exhibition Galleries, Level Three


The 2015 novel Wabanaki Blues by Melissa Tantaquidgeon Zobel (Mohegan) is hard to classify; the labels “rise to fame,” “murder mystery,” “suspense,” and “romance” are accurate but insufficient. The story’s protagonist, Mona Lisa LaPierre, is a teenage Mohegan/ Abenaki/French-Canadian blues musician whose professor parents force her to spend a summer away from her urban Hartford, Connecticut home in the remote New Hampshire woods. There, with her quirky grandfather and a fellow musician/love interest, Del, she begins to unravel two big mysteries: The significance of some family secrets involving bears; and the unsolved murder of a girl who once attended her Hartford high school and who turns out to have some New Hampshire ties of her own. Dr. Mandy Suhr-Sytsma, lecturer in the English Department at Emory, will lead a discussion of this page turner of a book and the contemporary Native American communities of New England that it represents. Fee includes cost of the book. Ages 13 to 17.

Fee for Teen's Workshops: $15 for Carlos Museum members; $20 for non-members. Registration is required by contacting Alyson Vuley at 404-727-0519 or avuley@emory.edu.

Support for educational programs for children and families at the Carlos Museum comes from the David R. Clare and Margaret C. Clare Foundation.
Middle School Curriculum Based Tours
7th Grade:  Continuity and Change: Material Culture in the Near East, Africa and South Asia.
This journey through the galleries explores objects related to Hinduism and Buddhism including Durga subduing the buffalo demon, and Buddha in the famous “calling the earth to witness” posture. Students will compare the images of the meditative Buddha with the narrative movement of Hindu figures used to tell stories as devotees visit the temples. Oil lamps and pilgrim flasks, and images of Jonah swimming represent only a few of the objects created during the formative years of Judaism and Christianity.  Students will explore work created by the ancient kingdoms of the Middle East, today known as Iran, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon and Afghanistan.  NOTE: the African galleries will not be available until February 13, 2016. [In the African galleries, students will explore objects from the traditional, indigenous religions as well as pieces influenced by the spread of Christianity and Islam. Objects that reflect the influence of European colonization can be seen in traditional shrine sculptures that include images based on imported objects such as  top hats. The gold figures and weights from Ghana come from the Asante people who once controlled the gold trade and developed kente cloth, the fabric that has come to represent the rich cultures of Africa throughout much of the world.]

 
The Ancient Americans Before the Collision of Cultures. Students explore the civilizations that were in place when the Europeans arrived. Learn about the economic system that united the enormous Inka Empire through the use of a knotted code. The importance of maize is seen in planting implements, painted ceramics, and jewelry. The art of personal adornment is highlighted from giant, gold earspools and labrets to body paint. Students will have an opportunity to decorate their bodies with patterns based on the ancient American roller stamps in the museum.






High School Curriculum Based Tours

World History. Explore the ancient Mediterranean world, birthplace of writing and laws. See Egyptian and Nubian art showcasing decorated coffins, mummies, and hieroglyphs on papyrus and carved in stone. The Classical galleries emphasize the great stories of civilization on painted pottery and include objects from ancient athletic games, architecture, theater and beautifully crafted items traded throughout the Mediterranean.The Asian galleries introduce the dynamic images of the Hindu religion and the calm serenity of images of the Buddha. Enter the ancient American world for Maya and Inka works expressing the bond between the natural and supernatural worlds and the religious system of shamanism, found throughout the Americas. The African collection includes traditional objects for public festival and private ritual use, and images that show the influence of European colonization.

Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations. The ancient civilizations of the Near East, Egypt, and Greece come to life in the galleries at the Carlos. Students can explore the first settled communities of the Fertile Crescent, where writing, law, and trade developed. They can experience first hand the grandeur of ancient Egypt through mummies, elaborately painted coffins, royal sculpture, and hieroglyphic inscriptions on papyrus. In the ancient Greek galleries, sculpture, painted pottery, coins, and jewelry convey the richness of Greek mythology, the cultural values of honor and excellence, and the development of theater and epic poetry. Students will discover how Alexander the Great spread “Hellenism” from North Africa to Roman Britain through warfare, but also through trade and the spread of the Greek language.

Times and Texts of the Bible. Learn how objects from the Egyptian, Near Eastern, and Classical collections relate to the times and texts of the Hebrew Bible and the Greek New Testament. Tour includes an exploration of cylinder seals, pilgrim flasks, oil lamps and images of Bible stories left on pottery fragments from 1st century North Africa.




Foreign Languages

Spanish classes: Vea Y Explore. Spanish explorers brought their language to Meso, Central, and South America, but remarkable indigenous cultures predated their arrival. The ancient American galleries feature intricate textiles, elaborate work in gold and silver, and ceramics created by the Inka, Maya and other cultures in the region.






Latin Classes: Ars Longa, Vita Brevis. Since art is long and life, short, seize the day and visit Ulysses and the Cyclops, Menelaus and Helen, Europa and the Bull, and the Emperor Tiberius. Discover the importance of Roman imperial portraiture and propaganda. Find images of metamorphoses and reinforce your reading with scenes from Ovid and Virgil. Explore Roman funeral rituals and translate inscription on cinerary urns. Meet Romulus and Remus and see how important archaeology is in understanding the objects from Roman daily life.


Art Classes

Drawing in the Galleries: Tour and Workshop. Throughout history artists have drawn their inspiration and honed their eye by drawing from the great works of art. Why not inspire the young artists of Georgia with the Carlos collections? Spend an hour and a half exploring a collection, discussing the elements of art and drawing technique, and participating in a sustained drawing activity guided by experienced docent-artists.
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Carlos Reads Book Club

Carlos Reads offers an opportunity to read great works of literature related to the museum's collections and exhibitions in an informal, small group setting with distinguished members of the Emory faculty as guides. Previous Carlos Reads programs include Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, The LIfe of the Buddha, Plato's Symposium, the Ramayana, Margaret Atwood's The Penelopiad, and The Lost Mandala of Sherlock Holmes, among others. Sign up to read and discuss one book, or many.

Carlos Reads discussions meet on Monday nights, unless otherwise noted, at 7:30 pm in the Board Room on Level Two of the museum. Prices vary according to the number of sessions and always include the cost of the book. Registration is required for each club by calling 404 727-6118. 

During the 2015-16 academic year, Carlos Reads will present programs on Alexander the Great, Native North American literature in conjunction with the exhibition Indigenous Beauty: Masterworks of American Indian Art from the Diker Collection, Thomas Mann's Dr. Faustus, and works of Buddhist literature in conjunction with the exhibition Doorway to an Enlightened World: The Tibetan Shrine from the Alice S. Kandell Collection.

Fall semester's programs include:

Mondays, August 31, September 14, and October 5
7:30 pm, Board Room, Level Two

THIS PROGRAM IS FULL AND NO ADDITIONAL RESERVATIONS MAY BE TAKEN
When he died in Babylon in June 323 BCE, Alexander III of Macedon ("the Great") was already a mythic figure. Unraveling and interpreting the story of his life and career is further complicated by the loss of most of the contemporary historical accounts, requiring us to read the story through the lenses of later authors for whom Alexander was much more than a simple king and conqueror. Cindy Patterson, professor of history at Emory, will lead readers through three quite different literary portraits of Alexander:  The Life of Alexander written by Plutarch, a Greek philosopher and moralist writing under the Roman Empire, c. 100 CE, who had access to many accounts now lost; the anonymous Greek Alexander Romance, a complex text with origins in the vibrant culture of early Ptolemaic Alexandria; and Mary Renault's The Persian Boy, a 20th-century historical novel in which Alexander is seen through the eyes of a young Persian eunuch who falls in love with his conqueror.

Fee:  $55 for Carlos Museum members; $75 non-members, and includes the cost of the books.  Registration is required by calling 404-727-6118.


Monday, September 21
7:30 pm, Board Room, Level Two

Emory professor Craig Womack leads readers through what he has described as "one of the strongest short stories in all of American Indian fiction and one of the strongest short shorts in any literature," "Summer Water and Shirley" by Creek writer and visual artist, Durango Mendoza. Set on the camp grounds near the Thlewarle Indian Baptist Church in Oklahoma, the story revolves around a child whose playfulness crossing boundaries leads to a life and death crisis. 

Fee:  $20 for Carlos Museum members; $25 non-members.  Registration is required by calling 404-727-6118.
 

Monday, October 19
7:30 pm, Board Room, Level Two

Luther Standing Bear, an important figure among the Oglala Lakota whose ledger paintings are featured in Indigenous Beauty: Masterworks of American Indian Art from the Diker Collection, acquired fame as chronicler of a period of massive change for Plains tribes, as their livelihoods and territories were jeopardized during the late 19th century and early 20th century. In My People the Sioux, a 1928 autobiography with an ethnographic touch, Standing Bear describes stations of his paradigmatic life journey: he recounts his experiences from his childhood in his tribal community to his education at the Carlisle Indian School to his participation in Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show. Levin Arnsperger, Native Studies scholar and assistant director of Emory University’s ESL Program, will lead a the discussion focusing on the various points along this trajectory as well as Standing Bear’s writing style and his place in Native American literature.

Fee:  $20 for Carlos Museum members; $25 non-members, and includes the cost of the books.  Registration is required by calling 404-727-6118.


Monday, November 9
7:30 pm, Board Room, Level Two

One may not necessarily associate American Indians with the sport of baseball, so Choctaw writer LeAnne Howe’s novel Miko Kings opens up surprising vistas on the pursuit of the national pastime in Indian Territory. As she constructs an intriguing narrative about an Indian baseball team in the early twentieth century, on the verge of Oklahoma statehood, Howe weaves a tapestry of stories about 19th- and 20th-century federal Indian policy, race relations, and small-town life. Offering rich insights into the situation of various Native tribes both past and present, Miko Kings is also a witty, original story of resistance and persistence. Dr. Levin Arnsperger, Native Studies scholar and assistant director of Emory University’s ESL Program, will lead the discussion of Howe’s 2007 novel.

Fee:  $20 for Carlos Museum members; $25 non-members, and includes the cost of the books.  Registration is required by calling 404-727-6118.


Monday, November 16
7:30 pm, Board Room, Level Two

The experience of peoples indigenous to California has been misunderstood and misrepresented for centuries. Deborah Miranda (Esselen/Chumash) offers a much-needed corrective in her 2012 non-fiction work, Bad Indians: A Tribal Memoir. Miranda presents the brutal Spanish missionization of California Indians and its lasting impact through a mix of poetry and prose, personal experience, and scholarship. Dr. Mandy Suhr-Sytsma, Lecturer in the English Department at Emory, leads readers through this groundbreaking work, drawing attention to the text’s literary features and unpacking the little-known histories it represents. She also helps readers to situate the book in relation to issues facing indigenous communities in California today, including those involving recognition, language revitalization, and the repatriation of artifacts and remains.

Fee:  $20 for Carlos Museum members; $25 non-members, and includes the cost of the books.  Registration is required by calling 404-727-6118.

Monday, November 30
7:30 pm, Board Room, Level Two

In the 2014 novel Sacred Wilderness by Susan Power (Standing Rock Dakota), the Virgin Mary and a Mohawk friend of hers from the seventeenth century seriously disrupt life for Candace, a wealthy, contemporary St. Paul, Minnesota woman. They’re assisted by Candace’s housekeeper, Gladys, a Dakota woman whose strength, wisdom, and good humor carry the novel. Dr. Mandy Suhr-Sytsma,  leads readers through this work by one of the most innovate Native American authors of our day. Where is the line between respectful cross-cultural engagement and harmful cultural appropriation? (How) should spiritual life influence activism, scholarship, and art? And how does history continue to shape the present? Suhr-Sytsma invites readers to delve into these and other provocative questions raised by Power’s novel. She also helps readers explore real landscapes represented in the fictional work, from Haudenosaunee villages of the distant past to urban Native arts scenes of our own day.

Fee:  $20 for Carlos Museum members; $25 non-members, and includes the cost of the books.  Registration is required by calling 404-727-6118.

Access to Images in the Carlos Museum Collections
Over 1,000 high resolution images of works of art in the Carlos Museum's collections are available online through a web-based, searchable database called Luna. Browse the collection or, log in with an Emory user id and password to create "media groups" and export images into presentation programs such as PowerPoint and Keynote, as well as social media programs. Information on using Luna is available here.
Family Concerts

The Carlos Museum offers an exciting series of chamber music concerts for children and families performed by The Emory Chamber Music Society of Atlanta and special guest artists. Family concerts are a wonderful way to introduce children of all ages to chamber music in the intimate space of the Carlos Museum's Reception Hall. Concerts last for approximately one hour.


Jurassic Music!
Sunday, October 4, 4 pm
Reception Hall, Level Three

Dinosaur music including T. Rex and the Raptors for French horns and other musical animals are featured in this fun prehistoric concert.







Santa's Favorite Chamber Music
Sunday, December 13, 4 pm
Reception Hall, Level Three

We welcome back Old Saint Nick himslef to introduce some of his favorite classical works and give treats to good listeners.



Babar the Elephant
Sunday, January 31, 4 pm
Reception Hall, Level Three

Jean de Brunhoff's classic tale set to beautiful solo piano music by Francis Poulenc, performed by pianist Elena Cholakova and narrated by the legendary voice of classical radio in Atlanta, Lois Reitzes.  Bring your own book and follow along!







Pajama Concert
Friday, February 26, 7:30 pm
Reception Hall, Level Three

Enjoy great music with some hot chocolate and marshmellows on a cold winter evening, and if you like, wear your pajamas and bring a pillow!






Atlanta's Young Artists
Sunday, April 10, 4 pm
Reception Hall, Level Three

Some of the area's finest pre-college musicians perform on this exciting annual showcase of what talent abd hard work can produce.



Family Concerts at the Carlos Museum are made possible through the generous financial support of the Christian Humann Foundation. 


Camp Carlos

Camp Carlos 2015 was a summer full of explorations and art-making!  Children created sand paintings, medicine bags, clay effigy pots and more in conjunction with the special exhibition Spider Woman to Horned Serpent: Creation and Creativity in Native North American Art.  They explored the cultural contact between the ancient worlds of Egypt and Greece as related to the Rick Riordan short story The Staff of Serapis, a cross-over from the Percy Jackson and the Kane Chronicles series.  Children created a collaborative comic book based on the Indian epic, The Ramayana.  They were actors, pencilers, inkers, and colorists, as well as art historians, examing the eighteenth century Indian miniatures of the Ramayana in the Carlos Museum collection.  Teens created sculptures in wax and then turned them into bronze sculptures using the ancient lost wax casting technique with the artists at Inferno Art Foundry. 

Registration for Camp Carlos 2016 will open January 15 for Carlos Museum members and on February 1 for non-members.  For more information please contact Alyson Vuley at 404-727-0519 or avuley@emory.edu 

Camp Carlos 2015 was made possible in part by a generous gift from Panton Capital Holdings. Additional sponsorship for educational programs for children and families at the Carlos Museum comes from the David R. Clare and Margaret C. Clare Foundation, the Marguerite Colville Ingram Fund, and Clara M. and John S. O'Shea.

Common Core and Georgia Performance Standards
Docent-led tours of the collections of the Carlos Museum are designed to meet Common Core and Georgia Performance Standards in many areas of the curriculum, providing a vivid entry to the study of world cultures through art. Expand the classroom experience and the imaginations of your students with a visit to Emory’s Carlos Museum. During tours students will:
  • build critical-thinking skills
  • compare similarities and differences (Social Studies Skills Matrix #1.)
  • analyze artifacts ( Social Studies Skills Matrix #10.)
  • draw conclusions and make generalizations (Social Studies Skills Matrix #11.)
  • understand how people express their beliefs and ideas through objects (Historical Understanding; all levels).
  • explore diversity and a variety of religious concepts (Historical Understanding; all levels)
  • become acquainted with cultures and traditions from around the world (Historical and Geographic Understanding, all levels).
  • ask questions that lead to investigations (Habits of Mind)
  • Use date to answer questions and identify patterns of change (Habits of MInd)
Carlos and the Common Core: 
Georgia’s Common Core curriculum uses literacy and language skills to prepare students for success in college, career and life. Learning in a museum setting builds vocabulary and connects classroom reading to original source material; works of art as tangible documents of history.  They will compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and patterns of events from several cultures; from Classical Greece and Rome, to ancient Egypt, the Americas, south Asia, and sub Saharan Africa.  In the museum, students will expand their classroom knowledge in a different medium, and will use cogent reasoning and evidence collecting skills to express their interpretations and opinions.  As an extension of the classroom, the Carlos invites you to bring your classes to explore the stories of civilization.
 
Lectures, Symposia, and Gallery Talks
The Museum's commitment of academic excellence is reflected in the lectures, symposia, and gallery talks presented by the Office of Educational Programs. The Museum draws on the rich resources of the University's faculty and supports Emory's academic mission by bringing nationally and internationally recognized scholars, authors, and artists to campus. Most of these public lectures and symposia are free and all are open to the Emory community and the public. For a listing of upcoming programs, please see the Calendar.
Public Programs of Interest to Students

The Carlos Museum offers a wide variety of public programs of interest to Emory students. For a complete listing of these programs, please see the Calendar.

Subscribe to our Adult Programs Email List
 
For Families: Explore the Greek and South Asian Collections at the Carlos with Our Family Guides!
Thanks to the generosity of the Ceres Foundation and to the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, the Carlos is pleased to offer family guides to our Greek and South Asian collections.  Featuring die-cut images of objects in the collection, lively text, and quotes from ancient sources, these collectable guides make exploring the galleries fun for children as they search for the featured objects and discover more about them.

The guides are available at no charge at the Reception Desk on Level One.
How to Schedule a School Tour

The Michael C. Carlos Museum welcomes school groups to explore the Museum's collections and special exhibitions with members of the Museum's Docent Guild.

To schedule a guided tour, download the new Tour Reservation Request Form, which can be filled out and returned to the Museum by email to alyson.vuley@emory.edu or by fax to 404-727-4292.  Once your tour request form is received, you will be contacted by Office of Educational Programs staff to confirm your tour.  Your tour is not confirmed simply by submiting the request form, but only when you have received an email confirmation and invoice.

Tour Times: Tours are offered Tuesday through Friday at 10 a.m., 11 a.m., and noon.
Group Size: Maximum number is 65 guests per hour. Grade levels larger than 65 may schedule back to back tours.
Length of Tours: 50 minutes.
Chaperones: One per every ten students required.
Fees: Visits are $6 per student. One chaperone for every ten students is free. Additional adults are $7 each.
Confirmation: You will receive an email confirming your tour date and time and invoicing you for payment.
Directions: Directions to the Museum and Parking Information.
Self-guided tours: Teachers who wish to guide their own groups are welcome to do so. Please remember that self-guided groups must also be scheduled in advance to avoid overcrowding in the galleries.
 

Subscribe to Our Children's and Family Programs Email List
 
Funding Your Museum Visit and Bus Transportation
Need help funding transportation for a Museum visit?
A generous member of the Carlos Museum's Advisory Board and the Emory Women's Club has given funding to support the cost of bus transportation to the Museum for Title I schools.  K-12 teachers may receive up to $300 towards the cost of bus transportation.  Contact Ana Vizurraga at 404.727.4280 or avizurr@emory.edu to apply. Funding will be awarded on a first-come, first-served basis. 

Target Field Trip Grants provides grants that allow teachers and students to learn in all kinds of settings. To apply for a Field Trip Grant go to www.corporate.target.com/corporate-responsiblity/grants.
Artful Stories for Preschools
Preschool children gather to hear a story surrounded by Egyptian, Greek and Roman, ancient American, Asian or African art before looking closely and discussing related works of art, and then transitioning to the studio for a hands on activity!  This free program is made possible through generous funding from PNC Bank and is available for preschool classes on Monday mornings at 10 am when the museum is closed to the general public, offering a special environment for young children to experience art, literacy, and cultures of the world.
  • Maximum twenty children per group.
  • One chaperone for every five children.
  • If your group has special needs, please call to discuss possible adjustments to the program.
  • Space is limited, so please sign up early to reserve a space for your class.
To make a reservation for your preschool class to participate in Artful Stories for Preschools, please contact Alyson Vuley at 404-727-0519 or avuley@emory.edu.


Artful Stories: When Clay Sings

Children will visit the special exhibition Spider Woman to Horned Serpent: Creation and Creativity in Native North American Art where they will hear the story When Clay Sings and learn about what clay has meant and continues to mean to indigenous people in the American Southwest.  After the story, children will make pinch pots with Atlanta ceramic artist, Ana Vizurraga.  








Artful Stories: Ganesha’s Sweet Tooth

Children will hear the story Ganesha’s Sweet Tooth, by Pixar animator Sanjay Patel, under the friendly gaze and round belly of the museum’s 9th-century sandstone image of Ganesha. After the story, children will create “leaf Ganeshas” while enjoying his favorite treat, laddoos! 


 

Artful Stories: Storm Boy

Children will experience a journey beneath the sea with a Haida prince in Owen Paul Lewis’ beautiful picture book, Storm Boy, before exploring the animal-form clappers and rattles made by the people of the Pacific Northwest in the exhibition Indigenous Beauty. Children will then create orca collages inspired by Haida imagery. 








 

Artful Stories: Tasunka: A Lakota Horse Legend

Children will learn about the pictographic art of the Plains peoples in Tasunka, written and illustrated in the ledger art style by Donald F. Montileaux (Lakota). Children will compare Joseph No Two Horn’s thunderbird shield, made with hide and natural pigments, to a ledger art drawing by Swift Dog (Lakota) of Joseph No Two Horns riding his horse and carrying the same shield. Children will then make their own pictorial shields. 
 

Abenaki Storytelling and Musical Event with Joseph Bruchac

Joseph Bruchac is coming to the Carlos Museum! Bruchac is a prolific writer with many beautiful children’s books to his credit, including The First Strawberries and Between Earth and Sky: Legends of Native American Sacred Places. Bruchac is also a collector of myths and legends, preserver of Abenaki culture, poet, musician, educator, and perhaps most of all, extraordinary storyteller. He will spend a morning with preschoolers sharing his stories and traditional Abenaki songs and instruments.







This program is made possible through the generous support of PNC Bank.
Additonal support for educational programs for children and families at the Carlos Museum comes from the David R. Clare and Margaret C. Clare Foundation, and the Marguerite Colville Ingram Fund.

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