Education

The Carlos Museums offers a wide variety of public programs for adults from scholarly symposia to informal Talk & Taste programs. Click on listings below for descriptions of programs below or visit the Museum calendar for specific information on scheduled programs.

Workshops for Children

The Office of Educational Programs offers innovative and engaging workshops in which children and their families explore the collections and exhibitions at the Museum. Through in-gallery experiences and art projects, children learn about the arts and cultures of the world.


Sunday, November 2
1-5 pm, Tate Room, Plaza Level
The Maize God and the Hero Twins Workshop for Children
Through illustrations on cylindrical vessels (used by the Maya for chocolate!) and Maya hieroglyphs in the Art of the Americas Galleries, assistant curator Laura Wingfield will introduce children to some of the heroes of the sacred creation book of the Maya, the Popol Vuh. Explore the maize god and the demi-god twins, Ixb’alanke with jaguar patches on his skin and Hunahpu, covered in moles shaped like the moon! Children will create a storytelling cylindrical vessel with ceramic artist Ana Vizurraga.

For ages 10 to 12 years. Fee: $15 for Carlos Museum members; $20 for non-members. Registration is required by contactling Alyson Vuley at 404-727-0519 or avuley@emory.edu.





Sunday, November 16
2-4 pm, Tate Room, Plaza Level
AVATARS: the Manifestations of Vishnu Workshop for Children
Vishnu, Hindu god of preservation, appears on Earth in different forms in times of strife and disorder in the world. Children will investigate images and stories of the ten forms of Vishnu in the Asian gallery and then create their own avatar, representing their power and responsibility to make the world a better place, with teaching artist Pam Beagle-Daresta.

For ages 8 to 12 years. Fee: $15 for Carlos Museum members; $20 for non-members. Registration is required by contacting Alyson Vuley at 404-727-0519 or avuley@emory.edu.
THIS WORKSHOP IS NOW FULL.

Sunday, January 18
2-4 pm, Tate Room, Plaza Level
Storytelling with Clay
The first epic story to be written down wasn’t written on paper – it was written on clay tablets! Children will hear the story of Gilgamesh and look at clay tablets and other Sumerian artifacts in the Near East Galleries. Children will create their own story on a clay tablet.

For ages 6 to 8 years. Fee: $12 for Carlos Museum members; $15 for non-members. Registration is required by contacting Alyson Vuley at 404-727-0519 or avuley@emory.edu.

 

Sunday, January 25
2-4 pm, Tate Room, Plaza Level
Humbaba, Monster Protector
Learn about the fearsome Humbaba who protected the ancient cedar forest of Mesopotamia in the epic story, Gilgamesh. Children will examine the head of Humbaba and other ancient Sumerian artifacts in the Near East Galleries before creating their own monster face amulets with teaching artist, Pam Beagle-Daresta.

For ages 9 to 12 years. Fee: $12 for Carlos Museum members; $15 for non-members. Registration is required by contacting Alyson Vuley at 404-727-0519 or avuley@emory.edu.

Sunday, February 8
2-4 pm, Tate Room, Plaza Level
Ptah and Egyptian Creation
Ptah, an Egyptian god of creation and revered by craftspeople, created humans on his potter’s wheel. After exploring the distinctive figure of Ptah and other Egyptian artifacts in the special exhibition, African Cosmos: Stellar Arts, children will build clay figures  of the god and try their hand at the potter’s wheel with ceramic artist Ana Vizurraga.

For ages 8 to 12 years. Fee: $15 for Carlos Museum members; $20 for non-members. Registration is required by contacting Alyson Vuley at 404-727-0519 or avuley@emory.edu.
AntiquiTEA
A civilized learning experience. Enjoy afternoon tea and scones as museum curators and Emory faculty members and graduate students discuss works of art in the collections and exhibitions.
 

Thursday, January 22
4 pm, Reception Hall, Level Three 
Dr. Marko Geslani, assistant professor in Emory’s Department of Religion, discusses a four-faced Lingam from 13th century from the museum’s collection of South Asian art and the generative power of the Hindu god Shiva it embodies.

Thursday, February 5
4 pm,
Reception Hall, Level Three
Annie Shanley, PhD candidate in the Art History Department, discusses Sopdet, an Egyptian goddess representing Sirius, the dog star, whose appearance on the horizon in late summer signaled the coming of the annual inundation of the Nile. A relief of Sopdet is featured in the exhibition African Cosmos: Stellar Arts.

Thursday, February 19
4 pm, Reception Hall, Level Three
Rachel P. Kreiter, PhD candidate in the Art History Department, discusses the ancient Egyptian conceptualization of the coffin as a representation of the cosmos with the deceased at the center. 

Thursday, March 5
4 pm, Reception Hall, Level Three
Laura Somenzi, graduate student in Emory’s Art History Department, discusses William Kentridge’s film Journey to the Moon, its construction and imagery, and its relationship to Georges Méliès' 1902 silent classic Le voyage dans la lune.

Thursday, March 19 
4 pm, Math and Science Center, Planetarium, 400 Dowman Drive, Atlanta, GA 30322

Enjoy afternoon tea and scones as visiting artist Marcus Neustetter discusses his work Chasing Light, which will be projected on the dome of the planetarium for this event.

Thursday, April 9
4 pm, Reception Hall, Level Three
Artists in Yoruba-speaking communities in and beyond present-day Nigeria have illustrated the cosmos as a calabash or wooden bowl with two halves. The top half refers to the sky and otherworld, presided over by the deity Olódùmarè. The bottom half relates to water and this world. Joining of the two sections indicates the interconnectedness of this world inhabited by the living and the otherworld occupied by ancestors and other entities. Enjoy afternoon tea and scones as Susan Elizabeth Gagliardi, assistant professor in the Art History Department, discusses Yoruba conceptions of the universe through a wooden example in the exhibition.

Thursday, April 30
4 pm, Reception Hall, Level Three
The stories of the Dogon, who live along the cliffs of Mali, have long been a part of the Western imagination. Beginning with the Carlos Museum’s recently conserved Kanaga mask, exhibited in African Cosmos, Amanda Hellman, curator of African art at the Carlos Museum, will explore Dogon myths, their understanding of Sirius, the brightest star, and the controversy surrounding
their history.
Spring Break Art Camp
Monday, April 6 - Friday, April 10
9 am - 3 pm, Tate Room, Plaza Level
Spring Break Art Camp: Bridging Earth and Sky: The Dogon of Mali
Every twelve years, the Dogon use tall plank masks called sirige that seem to reach towards the heavens as part of the dama ceremony to honor the ancestors and mark the end of mourning for those who died during the last cycle.  Sandra Hughes and Michael Hickey of The Mask Center in Atlanta will lead investigations about these cosmic connectors and then children will design and build individual plank masks that show a personal interpretation of bridging earth and sky and create a collaborative, group performance to be performed for parents and community at 2 pm on Friday, April 10. 
 
For children ages 8-12.  Camp sessions are $185 per week for Carlos Museum members; $225 per week for non-members. Camp Carlos offers a 10% discount to families registering siblings. Aftercare is available Monday through Friday from 3 to 5 pm for an additional $60 per week. Space is limited.  Please register by contacting Alyson Vuley at 404-727-0519 or avuley@emory.edu.
Workshops for Teachers

Teachers tell us that the workshops and PLU courses at the Michael C. Carlos Museum are unique. They value these programs because of the engaging content and the opportunity to work in small groups with scholars and artists who are not only experts in their areas, but masterful and generous instructors.  Join us this academic year for a rich mix of workshops that range from explorations in the galleries with Emory faculty and curators, to hands-on art experiences with guest artists. 

Workshops will be held from 5-7 pm and will meet in the Tate Room on the Plaza Level. Unless otherwise noted the fee is $7 for museum members and $12 for non-members. To register contact Alyson Vuley:  avuley@emory.edu


This year's workshops include:

Thursday, September 25
5 pm, Tate Room, Plaza Level
The Nippur Deluge Tablet and Noah’s Flood
Brent Strawn, associate professor of Old Testament at Emory’s Candler School of Theology, will introduce teachers to a cuneiform tablet discovered in the ruins of the ancient Babylonian city of Nippur and contextualize it in terms of flood stories from Gilgamesh to Noah.

Thursday, October 16
5 pm, Tate Room, Plaza Level

Egyptian Creation: Imagining the Unseen
Gay Robins, Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of Art History, explores how the ancient Egyptians’ physical environment shaped their understanding of the cosmos and creation.






Thursday, November 20
5 pm, Tate Room, Plaza Level
Creation in the Hindu Cosmos

Anandi Salinas, student in Emory’s Graduate Division of Religion, will introduce teachers to the god Vishnu and his role in Hindu stories of creation. In the galleries, teachers will view images of Vishnu including one with Brahma seated on a lotus emerging from Vishnu’s navel as he sleeps on the Cosmic Ocean in between cycles of time.

Thursday, February 19, 2015
5 pm, Tate Room, Plaza Level
African Cosmos: Stellar Arts

The Carlos Museum's curator of African Art, Amanda Hellman, will introduce teachers to this special exhibition from the National Museum of African Art at the Smithsonian Institution. The exhibition demonstrates how the observations of the heavens are part of the knowledge that informs origin stories, artistic expression, and ritual practice in African cultures. This evening includes a special planetarium presentation on the African skies in the Emory University Palanetarium with Emory astrophysicist Dr. Erin Bonning.

Thursday, March 5, 2015
5 pm,
Tate Room, Plaza Level
Creating Matter: The Prints of Mildred Thompson
Mildred Thompson's work is heavily influenced by African textiles, American jazz, European classical music, and German Expressionism.  While her early work was figural she moved towards total abstration the l970's. Join assistant curator, Andi McKenzie and guest printmaker to explore Thompson's experimental, late work made with glass plates. This unusual process creates mysterious washes filled with movement. Teachers will have an opportunity to experiment in the studio with printmaking techniques inspired by Thompson.

Thursday, March 19, 2015
5 pm, Tate Room

Beyond the Known Environment: Creating from What You Don't See
Join artist Marcus Neustetter for an exploration of African Cosmos: Stellar Arts and his installation piece based on the northern lights. Neustetter,  known for designing large scale public art projects, also creates delicate drawings based on our connectedness to nature.  His fascination with the illusive qualities of light have led to  technology-based installations, photography, and pen and ink drawings. Teachers will experiment with several art making activities that may be used individually or communally in the classroom, designed to spark the imagination to what may be beyond what you see.









 


Artful Stories at the Museum

When ancient art, great stories, and inquisitive children are brought together something exciting happens and young imaginations flourish! This program is for children three to five years old accompanied by a parent or other adult. Once a month on select Saturdays, children will be able to sit in the galleries surrounded by works of art and hear stories of ancient Greece and Rome, Egypt, Asia, the Americas, and Africa. After the story, children and their companions will move to the Tate Room to create works of art or participate in activities based on the story and the cultures represented in the Carlos' collections.

For ages 3 to 5 years and accompanying adults. These programs are free but a reservation is required by calling Alyson Vuley at 404.727.0519.


Manu’s Ark: India’s Tale of the Great Flood
Saturday, November 15
10 am, Asian Gallery, Level One
Sitting before an eleventh-century sculpture of Vishnu on the Cosmic Ocean in the Asian Gallery, children will hear a story about Vishnu’s first form or avatar, Matsya the Fish, in Manu’s Ark: India’s Tale of the Great Flood, beautifully retold and illustrated by Emma V. Moore. Children will use rubber stamps that represent characters from the story and ink in the vibrant colors of India to depict Manu’s reward for his kindness.  THIS PROGRAM IS NOW FULL.





In the Beginning: Deucalion and Pyrrha
Saturday, December 6
10 am, Classical Sculpture Court, Level One
Children will hear the Greek creation story of Deucalion and Pyrrha in the Carlos court, surrounded by Greek sculptures of gods and goddesses whose clothing was beautifully carved by ancient hands. Afterwards, they will head downstairs to the Tate Room for some serious dress-up fun with traditional Greek garments —peplos, chitons, himations and chlamys — and pose for photos. 





The Story of Utnapishtim
Saturday, January 17
10 am, Near East Gallery, Level One
In conjunction with the exhibition of the Nippur Flood Tablet at the Carlos Museum, children will hear the story from the tablet, The Story of Utnapishtim, from ancient Sumeria. Children will then press shapes of the three birds from the story — a swallow, a dove, and a raven— onto their own clay tablets.







The Star-Bearer: A Creation Myth from Ancient Egypt
Saturday, January 17
10 am, Egyptian Galleries, Level One
Children will listen to The Star-Bearer: A Creation Myth from Ancient Egypt before looking at the beautifully painted image of the separation of earth and sky on the coffin of Tahat in the Egyptian Galleries. Children will create their own piece of sky on cloth before engaging in imaginative play to lift up the sky from the earth, just like in the story.

This program is made possible in part by a grant from PNC Bank.

Carlos Reads Book Club

Carlos Reads offers an opportunity to read great works of literature related to the Museum's collections and exhibitions in an informal, small group setting with distinguished members of the Emory faculty as guides. Previous Carlos Reads groups have read Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, The LIfe of the Buddha, Plato's Symposium, the Ramayana, Margaret Atwood's The Penelopiad, and The Lost Mandala of Sherlock Holmes, among others. Sign up to read and discuss one book, or many.

Carlos Reads discussions meet on Monday nights, unless otherwise noted, at 7:30 pm in the Board Room on Level Two of the museum. Prices vary according to the number of sessions and always include the cost of the book. Registration is required for each club by calling 404 727-6118. 

During the 2013-15 academic year, in conjunction with Emory University's Year of Creation Stories, the book club will focus on creation stories from around the world. Spring semester's books include:

Monday, January 26
Indian Creation Stories

Assistant professor Marko Geslani and Visiting Distinguished Professor Naryana Rao, both of Emory’s Department of Religion, lead readers through a selection of Hindu creation stories, including Book Ten, Hymn 129 of the Rig Veda.

Fee:  $25 for Carlos Museum members; $35 non-members, and includes the cost of the book.  Registration is required by calling 404-727-6118.
 
Monday, February 16
African Creation Stories
African creation stories are as rich and diverse as the continent itself. Some have themes that will be familiar to those steeped in Genesis, such as the the Wapangwa concept that the Word was the motivating force behind creation, or the Malozi story reminiscent of the Tower of Babel. Others will be new and startling, like the Kono story in which Death is the original force in the world, existing before God. Nathan Suhr-Sytsma, assistant professor of English at Emory, discusses The Origin of Life and Death: African Creation Myths, focusing on a selection of memorable West African stories, the book's singular editor Ulli Beier, and a reworking of one of the stories by Irish poet Seamus Heaney. 

Fee:  $20 for Carlos Museum members; $25 non-members, and includes the cost of the text.  Registration is required by calling 404-727-6118.
 
Monday, March 2
Death and the King’s Horseman

Dr. Nathan Suhr-Sytsma, assistant professor of English at Emory, leads readers though Wole Soyinka’s extraordinary tragic play, Death and the King’s Horseman, which explores Yoruba worldviews in the context of British colonialism and the role of rituals in maintaining cosmic order.

Fee:  $25 for Carlos Museum members; $35 non-members, and includes the cost of the book.  Registration is required by calling 404-727-6118.
                                                                                   
Mondays, April 13 & 20
Plato’s Timaeus

Professor Richard Patterson of Emory’s Philosophy Department, leads readers through Plato’s creation story, Timaeus, exploring Plato’s concept of an orderly cosmos created by an intelligent creator, his view of the cosmos as beautiful and good, and his overarching “two worlds” framework: the eternal and divine versus the temporal and spatial.     
Fee:  $25 for Carlos Museum members; $35 non-members, and includes the cost of the book.  Registration is required by calling 404-727-6118.
University Classes that Use the Collections of the Carlos

SPRING SEMESTER 2015

ARTHIST/PHYS/AFS 190
African Cosmos 

Dr. Susan Gagliardi, Assistant Professor of Art History
Dr. Erin Bonning, Director, Emory Planetarium
How do artistic representations of the cosmos relate to what astronomers know about celestial phenomena? In this first-year seminar led by an art historian and a physicist, we will consider this question through parallel studies of the stars in the Emory Planetarium and arts on display at the Michael C. Carlos Museum. We will place special focus on the upcoming exhibition African Cosmos: Stellar Arts on view at the Carlos throughout the spring semester.


ARTHIST 485W / AFS 489W
Art and Display: Focus on Arts of Africa

Dr. Susan Gagliardi, Assistant Professor of Art History
 What happens when objects never intended for display in a museum gallery end up in one? In this course, we will examine how shifting local and global contexts impact the display of arts created by artists identified with the continent of Africa. We will investigate how objects travel to galleries and museums in and beyond Africa. We also will consider strategies for displaying arts of Africa within museums and in other spaces. Prior coursework in the arts of Africa is not required.

ARTHIST 729
Classical Antiquity in Miniature: the Michael C. Carlos Collection of Greek and Roman Gems

Dr. Eric Varner, Associate Professor of Art History and Classics
Dr. Jasper Gaunt, Curator of Greek and Roman Art
Ancient Greek and Roma gems represent a rich microcosm of classical artistic production.  Carved out of semi-precious stones such as sardonyx, amethyst, turquoise and rock crystal, cameos and intaglios depict a diverse array of imagery including mythological figures, animals, fantastic creatures, and portraits. Gems were produced for, collected and worn by a wide spectrum of ancient society from prosperous middle class patrons through Hellenistic monarchs and Roman emperors.  The Michael C. Carlos Museum has a very large and significant collection of Greek and Roman gems.  The seminar will trace the history, development, iconography, and context of ancient cameos and intaglios through the Carlos gems.  Issues of conservation, collecting, and display will also be addressed.  Students will work closely with individual gems throughout the semester and produce catalogue entries and other didactic materials for eventual publication and exhibition of the collection.

Art History 226
Ancient South and Central American Art

Dr. Rebecca Stone, Associate Professor of Art History
Introduction to the art and architecture of ancient Central and South America (Northern and Central Andes) with emphasis on Costa Rica and Peru. Art of various media in the Carlos Museum collection will be featured. This lecture course, with some hand’s on sessions and meetings in the Carlos Museum, introduces the art and architecture of ancient Central and South America, from 5000 BC to 1500 AD. Goldwork, textiles, featherwork, jade, stonework, cities and cemeteries wil be discussed. Objects in the Carlos Museum will be featured and opportunities to work on an upcoming exhibition of textiles will be presented. Shamanic religious orientation, politics and art, and the technologies of these cultures will be covered

Chem 365L
Analysis of Ancient Art

Renee Stein, Conservator
The main objective of this course is to introduce a variety of instrumental techniques, including spectroscopy, chromatography, and x-ray methods.  Applied context will be drawn from cultural heritage studies and conservation research, with specific cases and laboratory exercises related to antiquities within the Michael C. Carlos Museum. Students will analyze residues for evidence of cacao in ancient pots from Central America, consider possible sources of a mysterious substance leaking from a Roman sarcophagus, and identify pigments on Inca ceremonial beer vessels from ancient Peru.  This course takes an interdisciplinary approach and is a collaborative effort between the Emory University Chemistry Department and the Parsons Conservation Laboratory.  Funding for this course is provided by the Mellon Foundation.


 

African Cosmos Tour and Planetarium VIsit — February-April only
On Wednesdays, from February 4 - April 29, the Carlos Museum offers a special interdisciplinary experience in conjunction with the exhibition African Cosmos: Stellar Arts. The Emory University Planetarium has created a unique program designed to connect the depictions of solar, stellar, and lunar phenomenon in the exhibition with the study of them in the sky. 

The 40-minute tour and 40-minute planetarium program are offered back-to-back at 10 and 11 am ON WEDNESDAYS ONLY. 

The cost for the tour is $6 per student; there is no additional cost for the planetarium program. The planetarium program may NOT be booked as a stand alone program. 

To schedule this special program, contact Alyson Vuley at 404-727-0519 or avuley@emory.edu.
African Cosmos: Stellar Arts Evening for Educators
Friday, February 6
5 pm, Reception Hall
K-12 teachers and administrators are invited to a special preview of the exhibition African Cosmos: Stellar Arts. Enjoy light hors d'oeuvres, a 10% discount in the Museum Book Shop, and an introduction to the works and themes in the exhibition by Dr. Amanda Hellman, curator of African Art at the Carlos.
This event is FREE but an RSVP is required by contacting Ana Vizurraga at 404-727-4280 or avizurr@emory.edu.
School Tours
Why should students visit the Carlos Museum? Because throughout time and across cultures, human beings have taken the materials of the earth and created works of art that express their humanity. From the most beautiful work of sculpture to the humblest ceramic pot; these objects reveal the stories of civilization, from belief systems to political philosophies, to societal roles and structures, to patterns of daily life. Docent-led tours of the collections of the Carlos Museum are designed to meet Common Core and Georgia Performance Standards in many areas of the curriculum, providing a vivid entry to the study of world cultures through art. Expand the classroom experience and the imaginations of your students with a visit to Emory’s Carlos Museum. During tours students will:
  • build critical-thinking skills
  • compare similarities and differences (Social Studies Skills Matrix #1.)
  • analyze artifacts ( Social Studies Skills Matrix #10.)
  • draw conclusions and make generalizations (Social Studies Skills Matrix #11.)
  • understand how people express their beliefs and ideas through objects (Historical Understanding; all levels).
  • explore diversity and a variety of religious concepts (Historical Understanding; all levels)
  • become acquainted with cultures and traditions from around the world (Historical and Geographic Understanding, all levels).
Carlos and the Common Core:

Georgia’s Common Core curriculum uses literacy and language skills to prepare students for success in college, career and life.  The Common Core suggests that enduring, mythological stories are essential knowledge and can be the means to practice fundamental learning techniques.  Docent guided tours of the Carlos museums’ collections introduce students to critical-thinking, problem-solving, and the analytical skills that are the basis of the Common Core. In the museum, students are asked to discuss imagery based on mythological subjects, the sequence of events, and to find the main character. Learning in a museum setting builds vocabulary and connects their classroom reading to original source material; works of art as tangible documents of history.  They will compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and patterns of events from several cultures; from Classical Greece and Rome, to ancient Egypt, the Americas, south Asia, and sub Saharan Africa.  In the museum, students will expand their classroom knowledge in a different medium, and will use cogent reasoning and evidence collecting skills to express their interpretations and opinions.  The Carlos Museum’s can be an extension of the classroom and invites you to bring your classes to explore the stories of civilization.
 

Teachers may request tours of the Museum's special exhibitions, specific areas of the permanent collection (up to three galleries, choosing from Ancient Egypt, Ancient Near East, Classical Greece and Rome, South Asia, Art of the Ancient Americas, and Sub-Saharan Africa), or curriculum-based theme tours designed to meet Georgia Performance Standards. See below for curriculum based themes:

Elementary School

Objects Have Stories to Tell:  Shapes and Symbols.  Designed for the young visitor, the students explore objects by looking for shapes and symbols of diverse cultures. What meaning might the shapes have?  How were they significant to people from long ago who made them? This 45-minute experience includes gallery explorations in small groups with museum docents.  Students draw shapes and symbols, hear ancient stories from Egypt, Greece, or south Asia, and decorate their hands with roller stamps based on the geometric shapes and patterns from the ancient Americas. NEW Fall 2014

Resources for Objects Have Stories to Tell:
PDF Kindergarten Standards: http://carlos.emory.edu/sites/default/files/kindergarten_copy.pdf


Archaeology. As they explore the galleries, students will learn about pioneering archaeologists like Kathleen Kenyon and the development of stratigraphy at the ancient site of Jericho. They will discover the excitement of analyzing artifacts once they have come out of the ground, from Egyptian mummies and coffins to sculpture, pottery, and jewelry from ancient Greece. They will discover the role of x-rays, chemical analysis, and other scientific techniques that contribute to an archaeologist’s understanding of an object.





Mythology. The Carlos collections abound with images from favorite mythological stories. Put a Percy Jackson spin on the Greek collection and see the Greek myths through the Rick Riordan characters. In the Egyptian galleries explore the battle between Seth and Osiris, and learn about the "weighing of the heart". The Art of the Americas includes the ancient Andean, Maya, and native north American peoples and their imagery. Students can explore character, plot, and setting, but also the larger meanings the myths had for the cultures that developed them.


Majority Rules. Developed by museum staff and 3rd grade teachers under a grant by the Georgia Humanities Council, this interactive tour for elementary students is aligned with the Georgia Performance Standards for 3rd grade. It introduces students to 5th-century Athens during the construction of the Parthenon and the development of the roots of democracy. The stories on ancient Greek vases depict scenes from the classics of Greek literature from the Trojan War to Odysseus’ voyage; the stories that are the exemplar of excellence and honor. Students will dress in a chiton and learn what it meant to be a Greek citizen; they will wear the olive wreath of the victorious Olympic athlete; and they will barter with blow-up versions of coins from the collection. Visit www.carlos.emory.edu for the Greek Passport booklet for students, Majority Rules vocabulary, and a follow up lesson plan.




Middle School

7th Grade:  Continuity and Change: Material Culture in Africa and South Asia. This journey through the galleries explores objects related to Hinduism and Buddhism including Durga subduing the buffalo demon, and Buddha in the famous “calling the earth to witness” posture. Oil lamps, pilgrim flasks, and images of Jonah swimming represent only a few of the objects created during the formative years of Judaism and Christianity. In the African galleries, students will explore objects from the traditional, indigenous religions as well as pieces influenced by the spread of Christianity and Islam. Objects that reflect the influence of European colonization can be seen in traditional shrine sculptures that include images based on imported objects such as umbrellas, top hats, and teapots. The gold figures and weights from Ghana come from the Asante people who once controlled the gold trade and developed kente cloth, the fabric that has come to represent the rich cultures of Africa throughout much of the world.


The Ancient Americans Before the Collision of Cultures. Students explore the civilizations that were in place when the Europeans arrived. Learn about the economic system that united the enormous Inka Empire through the use of a knotted code. The importance of maize is seen in planting implements, painted ceramics, and jewelry. The art of personal adornment is highlighted from giant, gold earspools and labrets to body paint. Students will have an opportunity to decorate their bodies with patterns based on the ancient American roller stamps in the museum.

African Kingdoms. Explore the great African kingdoms including the Asante, Yoruba, and the ancient kingdom of Ethiopia. Students will be introduced to images of power in warrior figures, elite jewelry, ritual weapons, and objects that represent spiritual power contained in masks and a magnificent egungun costume. Objects that reflect the influence of European colonization can be seen in traditional shrine sculptures that include images based on imported objects such as umbrellas, top hats, and teapots. The gold figures and weights from Ghana come from the Asante people who once controlled the gold trade and developed kente cloth, the fabric that has come to represent the rich cultures of Africa to much of the world. For additional resources for the African collections, see Discovery Outreach Program Royal Class: Kente, Gold Trade and the Asante Kingdom.

High School

World History. Explore the ancient Mediterranean world, birthplace of writing and laws. See Egyptian and Nubian art showcasing decorated coffins, mummies, and hieroglyphs on papyrus and carved in stone. The Classical galleries emphasize the great stories of civilization on painted pottery and include objects from ancient athletic games, architecture, theater and beautifully crafted items traded throughout the Mediterranean.The Asian galleries introduce the dynamic images of the Hindu religion and the calm serenity of images of the Buddha. Enter the ancient American world for Maya and Inka works expressing the bond between the natural and supernatural worlds and the religious system of shamanism, found throughout the Americas. The African collection includes traditional objects for public festival and private ritual use, and images that show the influence of European colonization.

Ancient Civilizations. The ancient civilizations of the Near East, Egypt, and Greece come to life in the galleries at the Carlos. Students can explore the first settled communities of the Fertile Crescent, where writing, law, and trade developed. They can experience first hand the grandeur of ancient Egypt through mummies, elaborately painted coffins, royal sculpture, and hieroglyphic inscriptions on papyrus. In the ancient Greek galleries, sculpture, painted pottery, coins, and jewelry convey the richness of Greek mythology, the cultural values of honor and excellence, and the development of theater and epic poetry. Students will discover how Alexander the Great spread “Hellenism” from North Africa to Roman Britain through warfare, but also through trade and the spread of the Greek language.

Times and Texts of the Bible. Learn how objects from the Egyptian, Near Eastern, and Classical collections relate to the times and texts of the Hebrew Bible and the Greek New Testament. Tour includes an exploration of cylinder seals, pilgrim flasks, oil lamps and images of Bible stories left on pottery fragments from 1st century North Africa.

Foreign Languages

Spanish classes: Vea Y Explore. Spanish explorers brought their language to Meso, Central, and South America, but remarkable indigenous cultures predated their arrival. The ancient American galleries feature intricate textiles, elaborate work in gold and silver, and ceramics created by the Inka, Maya and other cultures in the region.






Latin Classes: Ars Longa, Vita Brevis. Since art is long and life, short, seize the day and visit Ulysses and the Cyclops, Menelaus and Helen, Europa and the Bull, and the Emperor Tiberius. Discover the importance of Roman imperial portraiture and propaganda. Find images of metamorphoses and reinforce your reading with scenes from Ovid and Virgil. Explore Roman funeral rituals and translate inscription on cinerary urns. Meet Romulus and Remus and see how important archaeology is in understanding the objects from Roman daily life.


Art Classes

Drawing in the Galleries: Tour and Workshop. Throughout history artists have drawn their inspiration and honed their eye by drawing from the great works of art. Why not inspire the young artists of Georgia with the Carlos collections? Spend an hour and a half exploring a collection, discussing the elements of art and drawing technique, and participating in a sustained drawing activity guided by experienced docent-artists.
Artful Stories for Preschools
Preschool children gather to hear a story surrounded by Egyptian, Greek and Roman, ancient American, Asian or African art before looking closely and discussing related works of art, and then transitioning to the studio for a hands on activity!  This free program is made possible through generous funding from PNC Bank and is available for preschool classes on Monday mornings at 10 am when the museum is closed to the general public, offering a special environment for young children to experience art, literacy, and cultures of the world.
  • Maximum twenty children per group.
  • One chaperone for every five children.
  • If your group has special needs, please call to discuss possible adjustments to the program.
  • Space is limited, so please sign up early to reserve a space for your class.
To make a reservation for your preschool class to participate in Artful Stories for Preschools, please contact Alyson Vuley at 404-727-0519 or avuley@emory.edu.


Manu’s Ark: India’s Tale of the Great Flood
Asian Gallery, Level One                                                    
November 10, 17, 24, and December 1

Sitting before an eleventh-century sculpture of Vishnu on the Cosmic Ocean in the Asian Gallery, children will hear a story about Vishnu’s first form or avatar, Matsya the Fish, in Manu’s Ark: India’s Tale of the Great Flood, beautifully retold and illustrated by Emma V. Moore. Children will use rubber stamps that represent characters from the story and ink in the vibrant colors of India to depict Manu’s reward for his kindness.

The Story of Utnapishtim
Saturday, January 17
10 am, Near East Gallery, Level One
In conjunction with the exhibition of the Nippur Flood Tablet at the Carlos Museum, children will hear the story from the tablet, The Story of Utnapishtim, from ancient Sumeria. Children will then press shapes of the three birds from the story — a swallow, a dove, and a raven— onto their own clay tablets.

The Star-Bearer: A Creation Myth from Ancient Egypt
Saturday, January 17
10 am, Egyptian Galleries, Level One
Children will listen to The Star-Bearer: A Creation Myth from Ancient Egypt before looking at the beautifully painted image of the separation of earth and sky on the coffin of Tahat in the Egyptian Galleries. Children will create their own piece of sky on cloth before engaging in imaginative play to lift up the sky from the earth, just like in the story.


This program is made possible through the generous support of PNC Bank.

Museum Tours

Public Tours: Members of the Museum's Docent Guild lead public tours of the permanent collection and special exhibitions every Sunday at 2:00 p.m. Tours begin in the Rotunda on Level One of the Museum.

Docent-led tours are available for groups of ten or more by appointment. Please call 404-727-0519 to schedule a tour for your group. Please call at least two weeks in advance.

 

Family Concerts

The Carlos Museum offers an exciting series of chamber music concerts for children and families performed by The Emory Chamber Music Society of Atlanta and special guest artists. Family concerts are a wonderful way to introduce children of all ages to chamber music in the intimate space of the Carlos Museum's Reception Hall. Concerts last for approximately one hour. For dates and times for specific concerts, please visit the Museum's online calendar of events.
 

Sunday, October 26
4 pm, Reception Hall, Level Three
Babar the Elephant
Jean de Brunhoff's classic tale set to beautiful solo piano music by Poulenc, performed by pianist Elena Cholakova and narrated by the legendary voice of classical radio in Atlanta, Lois Reitzes.

Sunday, December 14
4 pm, Reception Hall, Level Three
Santa's Favorite Chamber Music
We welcome back Old Saint Nick himself to introduce some of his favorite classical works and give treats to good listeners.

Friday, January 30
7:30 pm, Reception Hall, Level Three
Pajama Concert - Music of the Night Sky
Enjoy great music with some hot chocolate on a cold winter evening and, if you like, wear your pajamas and bring a pillow!

Sunday, March 22
4 pm, Reception Hall, Level Three
Atlanta's Young Artists
Some of the area's finest pre-college musicians perform on this exciting annual showcase of what talent and hard work can produce.

Sunday, April 12
4 pm, Reception Hall, Level Three
Beethoven in Blue Jeans
Come hear and meet the master himself! Ludwig van B. comments on his life and music as the Vega String Quartet and pianist William Ransom perform a variety of music from Bach to the present.

All Emory Chamber Music Society of Atlanta concerts are free of charge and open to the public.

Seating is limited and is first come, first serve.

Family Concerts at the Carlos Museum are made possible through the generous financial support of the Christian Humann Foundation.







Chamber Music Concerts
The Office of Educational presents a series of noontime chamber music concerts performed by members and guests of the Emory Chamber Music Society of Atlanta. The concerts are free and open to the Emory community and the public. Please arrive early as these concerts fill up quickly!

This year's series includes:

Friday, September 12
Noon, Reception Hall
Cellist Christopher Rex joins the Vega String Quartet to perform Beethoven's stunning Kreutzer
Sonata. 


Friday, October 24
Noon, Reception Hall
The Emory Chamber Music Society and the Carlos Museum welcome pianist Tanya Stambuk, hailed by the New York Times as a "player with a powerful technique, ideas of her own, and considerable promise" for her Atlanta debut. 

Friday, November 14
Noon, Reception Hall
In a program titled Professors of the Practice, violinist Cynthia Patterson, professor of history; cellist Richard Patterson, professor of philosophy; clarinetist Ashraf Attalla, professor of psychology; and pianist Guy Benian, professor of pathology and laboratory medicine, join members of the Vega String Quartet to perform works by Mozart, Dvorak, and Poulenc.
 
Friday, December 5
Noon, Reception Hall
Emory's Young Artists program features the university's best undergraduate talent.

Friday, January 23
Noon, Reception Hall
One of the finest brass soloists in the world, Adam Frey travels the globe invigorating the
internationa music scene with his virtuoso talent, 
sensitive lyricism, and special connection with audiences.

Friday, February 13
Noon, Reception Hall
A program of Valentine’s Day Love Songs features instrumental and vocal music of love with tenor Bradley Howard, pianist William Ransom, and the Vega String Quartet

Friday, March 6
Noon, Reception Hall
Kate Ransom, violin and William Ransom, piano with special guest violinist Eun-Sun Lee.

Friday, April 3
Noon, Reception Hall
Stravinsky’s great masterpiece is performed by pianists Elena Cholakova and Elizabeth Pridgen in a stunning piano four-hands transcription, with Vivaldi’s Spring played by the Vega String

Friday, May 8
Noon, Reception Hall
Humorous music of W. F. Bach, Haydn, Beethoven, and P. D. Q. Bach interspersed with jokes about music and musicians.
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Camp Carlos 2015

The Michael C. Carlos Museum celebrates twenty-two years of providing exceptional summer programs in which children and teenagers explore the human impulse to create works of art. Camp Carlos offers participants imaginative and innovative opportunities to explore the ways in which people throughout time and across cultures have created works of art.

All sessions of camp include studio activities with some of Atlanta's best practicing visual artists, and visits to the Carlos Museum galleries, where campers learn from artists of the ancient world.

Camp hours are Monday through Friday, 9 am to 3 pm. Aftercare is available from 3 to 5 pm. Camp sessions are $185 per week for Carlos Museum members; $225 per week for non-members. Camp Carlos offers a 10% discount to families registering siblings. Aftercare is available Monday through Friday from 3 to 5 pm for an additional $60 per week. For more information please call 404.727.0519.

Informtion about Camp Carlos 2015 will be available in January, 2015. 
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From Nippur to Noah: Stories of the Flood
From Nippur to Noah: Stories of the Flood 
Saturday, October 18
2 pm, Reception Hall, Level 3


Accounts of a great primeval flood have resonated throughout history, from ancient Mesopotamia to modern concerns about environmental catastrophes. Join faculty from the Candler School of Theology and alumni of Emory's Graduate Division of Religion as they explore the significance of these accounts. This symposium coincides with the arrival of the Nippur Flood Tablet at the Carlos, one of the earliest Near Eastern texts to describe a world overwhelmed by water. A distinguished panel of scholars will give short papers about what these stories of devastation tell us about our history, our anxieties about humanity's place in the world, and the relationship between religion and the environment.

For more information on the lectures and speakers featured at this event, please click here.
Funding for Field Trips
Need help funding transportation for a Museum visit?
A generous member of the Carlos Museum's Advisory Board and the Emory Women's Club has given funding to support the cost of bus transportation to the Museum for Title I schools.  K-12 teachers may receive up to $300 towards the cost of bus transportation.  Contact Ana Vizurraga at 404.727.4280 or avizurr@emory.edu to apply. Funding will be awarded on a first-come, first-served basis. 

Target Field Trip Grants provides grants that allow teachers and students to learn in all kinds of settings. To apply for a Field Trip Grant go to www.corporate.target.com/corporate-responsiblity/grants.
How to Schedule a Tour for Your Homeschool Group

The Michael C. Carlos Museum welcomes homeschool school groups to explore the Museum's collections and special exhibitions with members of the Museum's Docent Guild.

To schedule a guided tour, download the new Tour Reservation Request Form, which can be filled out and returned to the Museum by email to avuley@emory.edu or by fax to 404-727-4292.
After typing information into the form please click the Save button at the end of the form.
Once your tour request form is received, you will be contacted by Office of Educational Programs staff to confirm your tour. Your tour is not confirmed simply by submitting the request form, but only when you have received an email confirmation and invoice.

Tour Times: Tours are offered Tuesday through Friday at 10 a.m., 11 a.m., and noon.
Group Size: Maximum number is 65 students per hour. Grade levels larger than 65 may schedule back to back tours.
Length of Tour: 50 minutes.
Chaperones: One per every ten students required.
Fees: Visits are $6 per student. One chaperone for every ten students is free. Additional adults are $7 each.
Confirmation: You will receive an email confirming your tour date and time and invoicing you for payment.
Directions: Directions to the Museum and Parking Information.
PLU Courses for Teachers

2014 - 2015 School Year

Teachers who register for five workshops in the Year of Creation series during the upcoming academic year will be eligible for 1 PLU credit from the Georgia Department of Education.  For information about registering for course credit, contact Julie Green at jgree09@emory.edu
Student Docent Program

Undergraduate and graduate students are invited to join the Museum's Docent Guild to give tours to K-12 groups, students, and the general public. Each fall new student docents are recruited and receive training on the collections. They begin touring in the spring. This provides students an excellent opportunity to develop research and presenation skills.

How to Schedule a School Tour

The Michael C. Carlos Museum welcomes school groups to explore the Museum's collections and special exhibitions with members of the Museum's Docent Guild.

To schedule a guided tour, download the new Tour Reservation Request Form, which can be filled out and returned to the Museum by email to alyson.vuley@emory.edu or by fax to 404-727-4292. Once your tour request form is received, you will be contacted by Office of Educational Programs staff to confirm your tour.  Your tour is not confirmed simply by submiting the request form, but only when you have received an email confirmation and invoice.

Tour Times: Tours are offered Tuesday through Friday at 10 a.m., 11 a.m., and noon.

Group Size: Maximum number is 65 students per hour. Grade levels larger than 65 may schedule back to back tours. Length of Tour: 50 minutes.

Length of Tours: 50 minutes.

Chaperones: One per every ten students required.

Fees: Visits are $6 per student. One chaperone for every ten students is free. Additional adults are $7 each.

Confirmation: You will receive an email confirming your tour date and time and invoicing you for payment.

Directions: Directions to the Museum and Parking Information.

Self-guided tours
Teachers who wish to guide their own groups are welcome to do so. Please remember that self-guided groups must also be scheduled in advance to avoid overcrowding in the galleries.

 

Funding for Field Trips

Need help funding transportation for a Museum visit?

A generous member of the Carlos Museum's Advisory Board has given funding to support the cost of bus transportation to the Museum for Title I schools.  K-12 teachers may receive up to $300 towards the cost of bus transporation.  Contact Julie Green at 404.727.2363 or jgree09@emory.edu to apply. Funding will be awarded on a first-come, first-served basis. 

Target Field Trip Grants provides grants that allow teachers and students to learn in all kinds of settings. To apply for a Field Trip Grant go to www.corporate.target.com/corporate-responsiblity/grants.

Andrew W. Mellon Internships

Thanks to the generosity of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Carlos Museum offers two paid summer internships for Emory University students. Graduate and undergraduate students with strong interest in and aptitude for museum work may gain experience during the summer term to augment their academic program. This summer, two interns will be selected by a committee of Museum staff and faculty advisors. The internships are ten weeks in length, forty hours per week, and students are paid $5,000. This summer's internships will begin Monday, May 19 and conclude on August 1, 2014, though some flexibility in scheduling is possible. Deadline for applying for the Mellon Internship is March 21, 2014.
 

Summer 2014 projects include:

Working with Dr. Amanda Hellman, curator of African art at the Carlos, on the upcoming exhibition African Cosmos: Stellar Arts, which opens at the Carlos in January 2015, and on the reinstallation of the permanent gallery of African art. The Mellon Intern will assist with researching and writing labels; the final planning for African Cosmos; assessing and researching the African collection for reinstallation; and redesigning the permanent galleries.  Some background in contemporary art and traditional African art and strong writing skills preferred.

The project in the Art of the Americas collection revolves around the planned 2017 exhibition Threads of Time: Tradition and Change in Indigenous American Textiles. The Mellon Intern will work with Dr. Rebecca Stone, curator of Art of the Americas, to finalize the object selection, prioritize conservation needs, reconstruct one or more ancient textiles for an article in the exhibition catalogue, and research individual Bolivian and Peruvian pieces. Background in the textile history of Americas, in weaving, and in museology are preferred.
 
Working with Andi McKenzie, assistant curator of works on paper, the third Mellon internship will focus on the upcoming exhibition God Spoke the Earth: Stories of Genesis is Prints and Drawings. This exhibition will consist of works on paper from the Carlos Museum's permanent collection, MARBL, Pitts Library, and other institutions. The Mellon Intern will work closely with Carlos Museum staff in all phases of exhibition planning, including research, developing didactic material, and exhibition layout.

Download the Mellon Internship Application here.

The Carlos Museum also offers unpaid internships, often for credit, and other opportunities for working and learning in a museum environment for Emory students. For more information about internships, contact Elizabeth Hornor by phone at 404-727-6118, or by email at ehornor@emory.edu.

Subscribe to our email list for homeschool programs
 
Subscribe to our email list for K-12 programs
 
For Families: Explore the Greek and South Asian Collections at the Carlos with Our New Family Guides!
Thanks to the generosity of the Ceres Foundation and to the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, the Carlos is pleased to offer family guides to our Greek and South Asian collections.  Featuring die-cut images of objects in the collection, lively text, and quotes from ancient sources, these collectable guides make exploring the galleries fun for children as they search for the featured objects and discover more about them.

The guides are available at no charge at the Reception Desk on Level One.
Subscribe to our email list for K-12 programs
 
Subscribe to our adult programs email list
Access to Images in the Carlos Museum Collections
Over 1,000 high resolution images of works of art in the Carlos Museum's collections are available online through a web-based, searchable database called Luna. Browse the collection or, log in with an Emory user id and password to create "media groups" and export images into presentation programs such as PowerPoint and Keynote, as well as social media programs. Information on using Luna is available here.
Public Programs of Interest to Students

The Carlos Museum offers a wide variety of public programs of interest to Emory students. For a complete listing of these programs, please see the Calendar.

Lectures, Symposia, and Gallery Talks
The Museum's commitment of academic excellence is reflected in the lectures, symposia, and gallery talks presented by the Office of Educational Programs. The Museum draws on the rich resources of the University's faculty and supports Emory's academic mission by bringing nationally and internationally recognized scholars, authors, and artists to campus. Most of these public lectures and symposia are free and all are open to the Emory community and the public. For a listing of upcoming programs, please see the Calendar.
Information for Faculty

The collections of the Michael C. Carlos Museum represent an important curricular resource for Emory faculty. Comprised of over 16,000 works from the ancient Near East, Egypt, Greece, the ancient Americas, sub-Saharan Africa, and works on paper from the middle ages to the present, the collections offer unique opportunities to engage students in discussions about original works of art and the civilizations that produced them.

The galleries provide an intimate setting for “out of the classroom” teaching. The diverse collections provide points of connection with a variety of disciplines and unique opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration. Faculty in art history, classics, religion, creative writing, dance, anthropology, and the sciences use the collections regularly in their teaching. The Museum encourages faculty from all disciplines to take advantage of the teaching opportunities available in the galleries and in the Museum’s classroom space using objects and works on paper from storage.

Guided and self-guided tours for students are available by calling 404 727-0519. Members of the Museum staff are available to help create connections between the Museum’s collections and exhibitions and coursework.

The Museum works with academic departments on campus to develop public programs of interest to the academic community. For a complete listing of these programs, please see the Calendar.

Audio Tours

An MP3 audio tour of highlights of the the permanent collection is available at the Reception Desk on Level One. The MP3 format allows visitors to hear from Museum and University experts at the touch of a button. The guide is available for a rental fee of $2. Museum members enjoy unlimited free usage.

A second audio tour makes connections between the Museum's permanent collections and the times and texts Bible. Curators and faculty members from Emory University's Candler School of Theology and the Departments of Religion and Middle Eastern Studies explore objects in relation to biblical texts to enhance our understanding of the cultures out of which Judaism and Christianity developed. The guide is available for a rental fee of $2. Museum members enjoy unlimited free usage.

Podcasts

The Carlos Museum announces Carlos Conversations, a series of podcasts that use works of art in the Carlos Collection to spark conversations between distinguished members of Emory’s faculty. Developed in conjunction with Antenna Audio, each podcast brings together experts from different disciplines to look at museum objects in new and unusual ways.

Voted "Best Use of New Technology for Exploring Ancient Ideas" in the 2008 "Best of Atlanta" issue of Atlanta Magazine!

Download any podcast to your iPod or any portable mp3 player, bring it to the museum and receive free admission!

Send us your comments about Carlos Conversation podcasts.

Odyssey Online

The Carlos Museum's interactive web site for kids of all ages continues to grow and expand. The ancient American and Greek sections have recently been updated. The Egyptian site is being updated now. Imaginative design and interactive technology create an engaging and entertaining way to explore the art and culture of the ancient world. Designed for the elementary and middle school student, Odyssey Online allows self-directed exploration of works of art in the Museum's collections and the cultures that produced them.

Visit Odyssey Online: Greece

Visit Odyssey Online: Ancient Americas